Transcript

Transcript for Alfred Cordon Emigrating Company journal, 1851 June-September

Roll of 2nd Fifty in First Hundred of O. Pratts Company
Alfred Cordon[,] Capt.ain

Names of heads of families

First Ten
Miles Anderson Capt.: 8 Souls 3 Waggons, 24 Oxen, 1 Cow, 3 Loose Cattle, 1 Horse
Wm. Holt: 7 Souls, 2 Waggons, 14 Oxen, 1 Cow, 1 Loose Cattle, 1 Horse
Allen J. Stout: 7 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen
Jno. [John] D.T. McAllister: 4 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen, 2 Loose Cattle
Caroline H. Gilliam: 11 Souls, 3 Waggons, 20 Oxen, 2 Cows
William Gough: 3 Souls, 1 Waggon, 2 Oxe, 2 Cows
Stephen Kiser: 4 Souls, 1 Waggon, 8 Oxen, 1 Cow
Ransom L. Mark: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows

Second Ten
George Spratley[,] Capt.: 4 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Alfred Cordon: 6 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows
Jno. [John] Wood: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 4 Cows
Jno. [John] Hayes: 6 Souls, 1 Wagon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
George Baddaley: 4 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Richard Steel: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 5 Oxen, 3 Cows, 1 Horse
Edwin Oakley [Okey]: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows,
Ephraim Luce: 1 Soul, 1 Waggon, 2 Horses
Jno. [John] Haslam: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Jno. [John] Hamer: 2 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 1 Cow
Wm Player: 2 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows, 1 Horse

Third Ten
Levi Ham[m]on[,] Capt.: 7 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 4 Cows
Will[ia]m Booth: 4 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Jno. [John] Maddison: 6 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen
Nathaniel Stewart: 12 Souls, 2 Waggons, 10 Oxen, 3 Cows
Edwin Trimmer: 7 Souls, 2 Waggons, 8 Oxen, 6 Cows, 2 Horses
Byron Bybee: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 6 Cows
Jno. [John] Gallop: 10 Souls, 2 Waggons, 4 Oxen, 6 Cows, 1 Loose Cattle
Ja[me]s Heath: 9 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 4 Cows
Jno. [John] Fisher: 7 Souls, 2 Waggons, 6 Oxen, 1 Cow

Fourth Ten
Jno. [John] Easton[,] Capt.: 7 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Alex[ande]r Easton: 8 Souls 2 Waggons, 8 Oxen, 2 Cows, 6 Horses
Ja[me]s Easton: 6 Souls, 2 Waggons, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows, 7 Horses
Alex[ande]r Meir: 6 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 4 Cows
Jno. [John] Birt [Burt]: 6 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows
Jno. [John] Stodget [Stoddard]: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Ja[me]s Bullock: 4 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Ja[me]s Williams: 6 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Will[ia]m Hartshorn: 4 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen
Henry Reese: 1 Soul, 1 Waggon, 2 Cows, 7 Horses

Fifth Ten
Henry Goldsbrough[,] Capt.: 3 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
David Thorn: 13 Souls, 2 Waggons, 14 Oxen, 4 Cows
D Brown: 9 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows
Tho[ma]s. Howard: 10 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen, 1 Cow
Isaac Piper: 3 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows
Will[ia]m Smith: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows
Ja[me]s. Shell[e]y: 9 Souls, 2 Waggons, 12 Oxen, 4 Cows[,] 1 horse
Will[ia]m. Thorn: 7 Souls, 2 Waggons, 12 Oxen, 4 Cows
Jno. [John] Brown [Broom]: 5 Souls, 1 Waggon, 4 Oxen

Total: 284 Souls, 61 Waggons, 293 Oxen, 104 Cows, 7 Loose Cattle, 29 Horses

Number of miles that we have traveled
1st day, 12 Miles
2nd day, 15 Miles
3rd day, 12 Miles
4th day, 12 Miles
5th day, 17 Miles
from Kanesville to 6 miles grove, 19 Miles
6th day, 10 Miles
7th day, 15 Miles
8th day, 15 Miles
[Total] 127 Miles

9th day, 7 Miles
10th day, 15 Miles
11th day, 10 Miles
12th day, 15 Miles
13th day,
14th day, 8 Miles
15th day, 20 Miles
16th day, 10 Miles
17th day, 15 Miles
[Total] 100 Miles

18th day, 15 Miles
19th day, 18 Miles
20th day, 12 Miles
21st day, 16 Miles
22nd day, 12 Miles
23rd day, 8 Miles
24th day, 18 Miles
25th day, 2 Miles
26th day, 15 Miles
[Total] 116 Miles

Number of Miles from Kanesville

from July 1st to 26th, 343 Miles
July 27th, 12 Miles
July 28th, 20 Miles
July 29th, 10 Miles
July 30th, 10 Miles
July 31st, 12 Miles
August 1th, 15 Miles
August 2nd, 20 Miles

number of miles from kanesville on the new road to the old one, 432 Miles

August 4th, 20 Miles
August 5th, 27 Miles
August 6th, 3 Miles
August 7th, 22 Miles
August 8th, 20 Miles
August 9th, 20 Miles
August 10th, 11 Miles
August 11th, 15 Miles
August 12th, 19 Miles
August 13th, 14 Miles
August 14th, 20 Miles
August 15th, 18 Miles
August 16th, 16 Miles
[Total: 217 Miles

August 18th 11 miles
August 19, 18 Miles
August 20, 13 Miles
August 21, 16 Miles
August 22, 18 Miles
August 25, 27 Miles
August 26, 20 Miles
August 27, 16 Miles
August 28, 12 Miles
August 29, 16 Miles
August 30, 12 Miles
August 31, 17 Miles

September 1st,18 Miles
September 2nd, 15 Miles
September 3rd, 12 Miles
September 4th, 16 Miles
September 5th, 18 Miles
September 6th, 10 Miles
September 8th, 16 Miles
September 9th, 10 Miles
September 10th, 15 Miles
September 11th, 7 Miles
September 12th, 14 Miles
[Total] 346 Miles

Number of Miles Continued from July 1st to
September 12th, 997 Miles
September 13th, 13 Miles
September 14th, 9 Miles
September 15th, 9 Miles
September 16th, 16 Miles
September 17th, 13 Miles
September 18th, 20 Miles
September 19th, 5 Miles
September 20th, 15 Miles
September 21st, 14 Miles
September 22nd day, 13 Miles
September 23rd , 14 Miles
September 24th, 7 Miles
September 25th, 16 Miles
September 26th, 14 Miles
September 27th, 12 Miles
September 28th, 15 Miles
September 29th, 16 Miles
September 30th, 5 Miles
October 1st, 11 Miles
[Total] 237

1851

Elder Orson Pratt Company Second Fifty

June 10 Camp of Israel June 10th /51

Campt at the mouth of the holler [hollow] near little pidgeon [Pigeon]. for all the waggons that intended to emigrate to the Val[l]ey, we Stoped their untill the 20th and then Started for the Ferry and Crosed the river on the 21st and 22nd inst and Camped on the river Side and on the 23rd Started and Came to the 5 miles grave and have been Camped heir 8 days and we have had rain most of the time[.] yesterday was Sunday and with it Came Brother Hyde and we organized a company of fifty and they roled out. Brother Harris Phelps was Chosen their Captain. Brother James Cummings Capt. of Hundred made Some very appropriate remarks with relation to guarding[,] herding[,] Carreling [corralling] and watchfulness and prayer and then Called on Brother Hyde to make Some remarks and Brother Hyde Said he had nothing to Say only listen to the Council that has been given and you will prosper and may God Bless you and he then Started on his way to the Val[le]y[.] Brother Orson Pratt is expected in Camp to day with his waggons and teams[.] the day is fine and prospect of fair weather[.] our Camp is healthy at present and all in good spiritz.

Tuesday July 1th[.] the day Broke very Cool and Cloudy and about 8.o.clock it Commenced to rain or Something like Soft Snow and Continued about 1 hour[.] at intervels Capt. Cordon ordered us to yoke up and we went at it and at 10.o.clock we roled out and Came 12 miles and Camped near the regular Camp ground at 4.o. clock[.] the day was very favorable for rolling and Some of the Brethren wore their over Coats while they were driving[.] no axident, we all Came along Safe[.] we found plenty of wood and warter

Wednesday July 2nd yoked up and Started on our journey[.] Came about 10 miles[.] Stoped and wartered our Cattle and then went on 5 miles farther and Camped on the reagular Camp ground about ¼ of a mile from the main road[.] the morning was Cool when we Started But in the after part of the day was very warm[.] the warter and wood is a full quarter of a mile from the Camp Ground [.] as Soon as each ten turned their Cattle out into the herde the Brethren got Supper and then each ten assembled for prayers[.] the gard was posted out and we all went to Bed

Thursday morning July 3rd[.] the Camp was arroused at day Break by the Blowing of the Horn[.] the Weather Cool and a Cloud rising[.] it is now begining to rain a little and prospect of a hevy [heavy] Shower[.] it is now 7.o.clock and we are Still Camped wating [waiting] for Some Brethren to Come up that belo[n]g to Cordons fifty[.] the Brethren came up at 10.o.clock and then we rold [rolled] out and have Come 12 miles and Camped at 5.o.clock along Side of the road[.] wood Scarce and warter plenty about a quearter of a mile of[f], the weather Cleard of[f] about 11.o.clock and it has Been a very fine day for traveling[.] we all Came along very well and found very good road[.] our Camp is healthy and all Seem to enjoy each other Society

Friday July 4th5.o.clock in the morning verry Cool and raining, Cold enough for an over coat and a large fire[.] 9.o.clock still raining But Brother [Alfred Edwin] Cordoron [Cordon] thought Best for us to roll out and we yoked up and in a Bout 1 hour it Stoped raining[.] we had very mudy roads all day[.] we Come 12 miles and Camped at 4.o.clock and as Soon as we got Carreld [corralled] it Commenced to thunder and Lightning and in less than a half hour it Commenced to rain and has rained verry hard and a great quantity of warter fell[.] it is now .8 o.clock at night and Still raining and their appers to Be a nother Cloud raSing [rising.] we pased a grave to day and on the head Board was writen in Black letters [“]hester Ann Hambling Wife of Lansford Hamblin and Daughter of Siman Stoddard died 29th and interd on the 31th of June[".] our teams Come along verry well allthough the most of them are raw Cattle, where we Camped to night the wood and warter is a good quarter of a mile from the Camp[.] our Company is in good health and in good Spiritz

Saturday July the 5th[.] we yoked up at 8.o.clock and roled out about 9.o.clock and have Come 17 miles and Camped on the road about half past 4.o.clock[.] warter plenty But no wood[.] in the fore part of the day the roads were muddy and Slippery[.] in the after part of the day their were good roads, and the weather was verry forable for traveling[.] we got a piece of papper from the road Side that was left by Brother Hyde advising us to keep a strong gard around the Carrell and to take the left hand road[.] we have traveld on the divideing ridge this two days betwen the Elk Horn and Misso[u]ri rivers and the Calculation is to head the horn and Loup fork rivers[.] the way we have Come is a new road[.] their appears to have not Been much travel on them[.] we travel nearly in a North West direction But the roads are as winding as the Missori river[.] Some times we go 2 and 3 miles to get one[.] when we Camped to day one of the Brethrens cows got loose with the yoke hanging to her and She run to and fro like a mad Bull[.] But we got her Stoped Before and [any] damage was done.

Sunday July 6th[.] 4 o.clock in the morning verry foggy and damp and the atmosphier is vey Close and it is very warm and has been all Night[.] 6.o.clock the fog Seems to Break a little and the Capt.ain and the Brethren thinks it wisdom to roll out untill we Come to wood and warter[.] if we had wood here we would Stay all day and let our Cattle rest[,] But Necisity Compels us to do for Som[e.] Cand not get any thing to eate with out Some fire for they have no Bread Stufs Baked up[.] Last Evening when we stoped Some Boiled a pot of mush with weeds, Some packed weeds, while others put them under the pots[.] at 8.o.clock the Cattle waz drove up and we yoked up and roled out and Come two miles and then had to Stop and let our Cattle cool for they had Begin to lol and it was Said by Some that <they> never experienced a hotter day in August[.] we then roled again and Stoped at intervals all day[.] we drove untill 6.o.clock and Camped[.] we found plenty of warter But no wood could Be Seen as far as the eye Could See. Brothers Cordon and [Benjamin] Al[l]en rode a hed to day for the purpose of finding a Camp ground and just after they Started they found a Stake in the rhoad and they Could read miles on it[,] but what number of miles they Could not make out for it was writen with Chalk and very porly done or the rain must have washed it out[.] their is a nice breese blowing to night and we all feel quite refreshed[.] the traveling to day was verry good and the rhods [roads] was sollid and our waggons run well on it[.] we have Come 10 miles to day[.] one of the Brethrens Cows was Sick and he Stoped his team and give her Some Salt and She got better right a way and one of his oxen fell down with heat but he Soon got over it and then rolled on to Camp about 8.o.clock[.] the Horn was blown and the Brethren assembled themselves to gether for the purpose of hearing Some remarks that were mad[e] by Captn. Cordon[.] he Spoke with relation to our Cattle and espeshley the wild Cattle[.] he advised the Company to yoke all the wild Cattle first and not have us detained every morning by yokeing up the Broke ones and letting the others go untill the last[.] the order was from him that every head Be yoked and hitched on to the waggons So we Could roll by .8.o.Clock and a nothering he Said he did not want the Brethren and Sisters riding a hed and running in Before those that were in the main road[.] he told the Company to all keep together and then if the Indians Come appon us we Could Carrell and be ready for them[.] and he Spoke with regard to wartering the Cattle[.] he Said he did not want to make a law on that Subject but he Said he did not think they wanted feed or warter and Spoke at Some great length on that[.] one thing he Said that Cows Can live with out warter and he had hearde <of some> the Brethren Say that the fattest Beefs was obtained without warter[.] he Spoke about the Captains of the tens makeing Complaint to him because <Some the Brethren> would not obey orders and he Spoke a long time on that[.] he Said if any man Can not or will not Stand up to his duty he Shall Suffer the Consequince[,] and no man Can go with us that will not obey the Council that was given By Captn. [James W.] Cummings and if we all will be united we Shall roll into the Valey of the great Salt Lake and we Shall be Blest of the Lord[.] let a man break down his waggon or loose his Cattle and if we are not united where will we be[?] we will be left on the plains to Suffer[.] But if we are united every man will Seize a pound or a fifty pound of loading and the Individual Could p[r]osecute his journey, he Called on Some of the Company to make what remarks they liked and Several Spoke at Some length on different Subjects[,] Some Concerning Cattle[,] Some gard[,] Some herding[,] Some prayer and their were Several of the Company that Said Cattle did not want warter in the middle of the day nor did the[y] want feed and it was Clarley [clearly] proven that Cattle Could do with out Either in the middle of the day and if they did drink it would be an injury[.] brother Cordon brought up the Story of the old king and his Subjects <and> the bundle of arrows and they could not take them all at a time and <break them but take them one at a time and> they were Soon Broken[.] he allso Spoke with relation to prayer and told the Brethren to attend to that little matter[.] he allso told them about the Brethren fasting and praying for our prosperity in Crosing the plains and why Should we the Subjects of that prayer not attend to our prayers night and morning[.] and he Called on all of the Capt.s of tens to See that it was attended to and Some of the Company made move to appoint a Captain of herde as well as Capt. of gard[.] Brother William Holt Capt. of guard was Chosen for that purpose[.] business being over we all joined in general prayer and then retired to our waggons.

Monday July the 7th[.] 4.o.clock thier is a good wind Blowing and has the appearance of rain[.] 6.o.clock it is getting verry warm and Sultry and the Cloud Seems to be passing round[.] at ½ past 7.o.clock we rolled out and traveld 15 Miles and Camped near the road Side about 1 mile from warter and no wood[.] the day was verry warm and the Cattle was verry much fatigued and one of the Brethren’s oxen gave out and Could not go any farther[.] at about 10.o.clock at night their was a Cloud Come up and it Blowed allmoste a hurrican and raind tremendious[.] the Cattle was verry restless and the guard had verry hard work to keep the Cattle in <carrell>

Tuesday July 8th[.] the morning is Cool and the Sky is nearley Clear[.] <9.o.clock> it is now getting warm and has the appearance of a hot day[.] we roled out at quarter past 9.o.clock and the day was a tolerable good day for rolling <for their was a cloud hid the Sun just after we Started>[.] we have Come about 15 miles <and> Camped[.] we Saw to day a board that was put up By Brother Hyde it is thought, and as well as we Could read it we made it out to Be ["]O. Hydes Company passed hear July 7th 1851[".] if it is him he is only one day a hed [ahead] of us[.] where we are Camped to night their is no wood but plenty of warter to the right of the road[.] our Camp is generally healthy with the exception of one man whose name is Ransom L Shark [Mark.] he appears to have the Billious fever[.] our teams Seems to Stand traveling verry well

July 9th[.] we hi[t]ched up by 8.o.clock and Started and the roads were prity good[.] we Come 7 miles and Camped about 11.o.clock for the purpose of washing and Cooking[.] the warter here is a half mile of[f] and the wood near 2 miles of but we made out to get both[.] the day pased of verry well and our Cattle has got a good rest

Thursday 11th [10th] of July[.] the day broke Clear and Cooll[.] the Sun is up now and a good Cooll breese ablowing and this morning at present is verry pleasant but has the appearance of a warm day[.] we roled out at 8.o.clock and found verry good roads[.] at 11.o.clock we Come across the Carrell <ground> that <was occupied by> Brother Morris Phelps[.] his Captn. of the <company that> left it on the 9th of the month[.] all well[.] this day has Been Verry favorable for rolling[.] we have Come 15 miles and Camped[.] not much warter and no wood[.] their was a Sister nocked down by one of the ox teams and trampled upon her but her injuries is not Serious[.] their is a Brother [John] Horton [Orton] whose Child is Sick with fits[.] friend [Ransom L.] Mark is getting Better of his fever[.] their has been a good Breese Blowing all day and we have Come along first rate

Friday July 11th[.] the morning is Cool and a nice breese blowing from the North west but the Sky is Some what Clouded But it has the appearance of a good day[.] Brother Ortons Child is dead[.] it died with inflamation of the Chest[.] its name is Alma Thomas Orton aged 1 year and 2 months[,] Son of John and Mary Ann Orton[.] it died at 11.o.clock p.m. July 10th 1851[.] we roled out at 8.o.clock and went about ½ a mile and we Came to a Swamp wich was like a marsh and we was an hour getting through it. we went a little Farther and Come to another wich was worse than the one preveious but we got through them Safe about 12.o.clock[.] we have made 10 miles to day and Camped where their is no wood but plenty of warter[.] the road to day has been Since we Crosed the Swamp [(]or Some Called them the horn) very hilly but good rolling[.] we Camped at 5.o.clock[.] in the Evening about 9.o.clock the horn was Blown and we all assembled to See wat was going on and Captn. Cordon a rose and Said he wished to make a few remarks and the first thing he wished to bring to <the> Brethren’s mind was this[:] that when we Come to place like we did to day he wanted every man when he had got out of danger to take his Cattle from his waggon and go and help the others and not lay down under the waggon or anchor his hind quarters in the waggon and get So lazey that they wished themselves Some where else and not let 6 waggons detain this Company an hour and three quarters as was the Case to day[.] well he Said ["]brethren the nex[t] item of buisness I wish to Call your attention to and that is a Seperation wich is about to take place and that is this, Captn. [John] Easton and his ten has declared they would leave this Company because we did not travel fast enough for them[.] they have Some horse and ox teams that walk faster than ours and a nother excuse they had for leaveing was they had not provisions enough to last them and that they Could travel from 25 to 26 miles a day[.] they have done it and they Say they Can do it again.["] Captn. Cordon then gave him and his ten his mind on the Subject and that was this[:] he did not want them to go and leave us but as long as they had taken a vote to leave amonst themselves he Said[,] go Brethren and let the responsibility rest on your on Shoulders for Said he I want no man nore Set of men that Cannot be united with us to Stay with us for we want no growlers here and every man that is not Satisfied with our mode of travel we want him to go with Captn. Easton in the morning[.] he Said I have been watching the Spirit of that Company for this Some time and I new it would Come to a Sepparation for the Spirit manifested it Self as not being united with this Company and Said he i want that man that Said he would go if he Could get any one to follow him and not Stop to Cook and wash he wanted to Shove ahead[.] well now their is a Chance for him to go allso and i want he Should go for Such big headed men as him we do not want with us for Said he every man [k]nows that it was right to Stop on that day for our wives done up their little domesticks and our waggons got sweetend and our Cattle got rested and we have gained more by it than we Should had we kept on our co[u]rse[.] the Brethren Said we have done well by Stoping on that day[.] the Captn. Said that Captn. Easton had Shown a Spirit of none Confidence to him not only once but twice and a third time and Captn.. Easton Said that that Captn. Cordon had a wrong imprishion [impression] with regard to his Confidence[.] he Said he had the best of feelings for this Company and Said he allways had for any of the Latter day Saints and he was verry <well> Satisfide with Captn. Cordon and he Could Say that he had the most Confidence in Captn. Cordon and allwa[y]s had Since he got acquainted with him[.] Brother Cordon Said he would Stick by those <that> would Stick to him and he wanted every man to Stay with him untill all the tens Say it is wisdom to Seperate[.] Said he i go in for union all the time and if we are united we shall role into the Valey in Safety[.] the meeting was then dismised by prayer

Saturday July 12th[.] the morning is Cool and pleasant[.] our Sick are getting better[.] the wind blows Cool from the South and it has the appearance of a good day for traveling[.] we rolled out at 8.o.clock and we have had a Splended day for traveling and have Come 15 miles[.] our road to day has been verry hilly but they were first rate good hard roads[.] Captn. Easton and Company and George W Johnson [-] roled out and left us this morning and when we Camped they were out of Sight when we Camped to day their is no wood but plenty of good warter

Sunday July 13th[.] the morning is Cool and pleasant but Some what Cloudy[.] the wind blows from the South East[.] the Brethren are engaged this morning in makeing an axeltree and reparing another and airing their waggons and it Seems to be a day of work insted of rest[.] but at 3.o clock the Horn was blown and we assembled together and our Captn. preached to us and his text was this[:] Camp expects every man wooman and Child to attend to their duty’s and exhorted the Brethren to watchfullness and prayer and Spoke with respect to the Brethren going to Sleep on their post[.] he Said that Several had Been found asleep while they were on guard and he Spoke at Some great length on differant Subject[s] and the <meeting> was then dismissed

Monday July 14th[.] the weather is Still Cool and pleasant and first rate weather for traveling[.] we Started at 7.o.clock and got the length of 4 miles and we Come to a large Creek and we had no timber to Bridge it So we went to Cutting weeds and grass and in 2 hours we had a good Crossing made[.] we got all over by dinner time and Come 2 miles farther and had another to Cross and we got over that in the Same way[.] we went about 1½ miles and had another to Cross[.] we got over it tolerable easey and then roled on a bout as far again and we had another to Cross nearley as bad as the first[.] we made a crossing as Before and we got over it about ½ past 6.o.clock and Camped a quarter of mile from it[.] there is no wood but we use as a Substitute Cow chips

Tuesday July 15th[.] the morning is warm and Clowdy and the musquitos are as thick as hops[.] we roled out at half past 7.o.clock and found verry good roads[.] the wind commenced to blow just as we Started from the Camped and it blew all day and the weather has been verry favorable for rolling[.] <we came 20 miles to day[.]> we Crosed to day 3 Streams or rather headed them as well as we Could but we had no difficulty in Crossing them[.] we Camped to day on the road Side[.] no wood but plenty of Slough warter[.] the Camp is generaly healthy and Seem to be united and is determined to press forward to the end of our journey

Wednesday July 16th[.] the morning is verry Cool and we Can hare [ware] our over Coats verry well[.] at 8.o.clock we rolled out and Come 10 miles and Camped[.] found plenty of wood and Splendid warter[.] it is as Cool as ice warter[.] we Stoped to day at 2.o.clock for to Cook and wash and rest our teams[.] we have Seen Some game but none was killed allthough the Brethren fired Some 12 Shots at an antelope[.] the day was verry warm and our Cattle loled verry much[.] we crossed a Stream just Before we Camped and the Brethren Called it the head warters of the running warter[.] at a bout 10.o.clock in the Evening it Commenced to rain verry hard and it has done a great deal of good to the roads for they were Sandy and verry dusty

Thursday morning <July 17, 1851[.]> Clear and pleasant[.] we Started out 8.o.clock and found good roads untill the afternoon and they were dusty[.] we Come 15 miles and we then Crosed a river[.] Some Call it the horn and Some the willow river and Some part of the Loupfork [Loup Fork] but we have Crosed it without any accident and Camped about two hundred yards from the Bank and their is plenty of timber and the river has very good warter in it. their is a good Bridge on it and all the Company that have Crossed appears to have got over Safe[.] their was Some writing on a tree at its Bank that Said it was the Horn,

Friday July 18th[.] Clear and plesant and a good Cool Breese blowing[.] we are all well and enjoying good health[.] we roled out ½ past 8.o.clock and we traveled ½ of the day through Sand which was very hevy rolling and in the after part of the day was tolerable good roads[.] we have Come to day 15 miles and had a Creek to Cross just before we Camped[.] we got along without any accident

Saturday July 19th[.] we Started out at a quarter past 7.o.clock and the roads were very Sandy and we traveled over Sand hils all day[.] we have Come to day 18 miles and Camped at half past 5.o.clock in the evening[.] we dug Several wells of warter and it was very good[.] we found plenty of warter for the Cattle but nothing to burn but Cow Chips[.] Mr Mark was worse of the fever all day and at Night he Seemed to grow Still worse[.] the weather to night is very cool

Sundy July 20th[.] we was aroused up by the guard at 2.o.clock and he told us that Tom T [Ransom L.] Mark was dead[.] we went to his waggon and washed and laid him out ready for the grave[.] 6.o.clock the wind is very high and is very Coold[.] it Blows the leaves of my Book So that i Can hardly write[.] Mr Marks age is 47 years

Sunday July 20th[.] we roled out at ½ past 8.o.clock and traveled through Sand nearly all day and at 4.o.clock we Struck the loup and Camped on near its bank[.] it is a nice Stream and very easy to ford[.] we have Come 12 miles to day[.] the weather has been quite favorable for rolling though the roads has been very heavy[.] we have Come along very well[.] no accident occured while we were Crossing the river[.] a Brother undertook to ride his near ox over and when his waggon Struck the opposite Side he forded his oxen up the bank and the one he was <on> gave a jump and he fell on the tong[,] roled off of that under his waggon with his legs across the track[.] when they <he> Started to fall their was a great Laugh[.] But when the Brethren Saw his Situation all was Silent expecting to See his legs crushed[.] but he drawed him Self up in a heap and the waggon neaver touched him and then the laugh Commenced again

July 21th[.] we rolled out and traveled over Sand hills all day and it was the heav[i]est pull we have had for Some of the Sand hills were allmost perpendicular[.] we got through the Sand at ½ past 5.o.clock and Camped on a good Bottom[.] <we have Come 16 miles[.]> no accident has happened as yet nor no Indian depredation[.] their is no wood nor much warter

Tuesday July 22nd[.] we yoked up at 4.o.clock and roled out[.] we traveled over a Splendid Country but very hilly[.] we Stoped our teams to feed at ½ past 9.o.clock. our road has been first rat[e][.] it is a good hard Substance allmost resembels Clay[.] we Started on our way again at 2.o.clock and rolled on over hills and hollers and their was a Cloud Come up at the time and rained all the time we traveled, we are Camped to night on the bank of the main Stream of the loup fork[.] we have Come to day 12 miles[.] plenty of wood and Splended warter[.] their was two waggons broke down to day Comming down the Steep pitches

Wednesday July 23[.] the Camp were all full of business untill 10.o.clock[.] then the horn was blown and all assembled to See what was the matter[.] Captn. Cordon Come forward and Spoke with relation to Crossing the river and Said he want every team yoked up and th Start at 12.o.clock[.] each ten doubled team and half of the fifty rolled over at a time[.] we all Crossed it in one hour and thirty five minutes[.] we Come up with Easton’s Company and they have lost 9 horses[.] they applied to us for horses to go and hunt for theirs but our Captn. told them that they Could not have them, just as we Started to Cross the Stream Easton’s Company Croweded in with ours wich [which] was not a very good trick and when they got in the middle of the river one waggon stopped and Commenced to Settle[.] we went to his assistance and pulled him out[.] if they had a listened to the Council of Brother Cordon they would now have had their horses and not have been a burthen [burden] to their Company[.] but men that will go Contrary to Council and think they are So Strong and Can go So verry fast on their own responsibility must take the lash at all times. we have Come to day with Crossing the river 8 miles and Camped where their is no wood but plenty of warter and good feed[.] Easton’s Company Come up after we had Carrelled and Camped a quarter of a mile a head of us.

Thursday July 24th[.] 6.o.clock Easton’s Company is out of Sight[.] 8.o.clock we hitched up and rolled out[.] we found Splended roads though it was over hills[.] the fore part of the day was verry favorable for traveling and we Come 8 miles and Stoped for dinner[.] then as we Started again at ½ past 12.o.clock and it was very hot and Sultry our Cattle was verry much freeted [fretted] and the road got Bad and about 4.o.clock their was two waggons turned over, one of them turned over twice with a wooman and two children in it but all escaped frome the wreck of the waggon unharmed[.] we Came to a prong of the loupfork river and laid By all night[.] we have Come 18 miles to day.

Friday July 25th[.] we Crossed over the river at 9.o.clock and rolled out 2½ miles from it and Camped to repair waggons[.] the Camp is generaly healthy.

Saturday July 26[.] we Started out at 8.o.clock and found good roads but plenty of Creeks and Slough's to Cross[.] we have come to day 15 miles and Camped on the road[;] no wood but plenty of warter[.] we have overtaken a Company of ten Belonging to Shirtliffs fifty of Allreds Camp[.] they have lost 26 yoke of oxen and their Company left them to look out for their selves

Sunday July 27th[.] we yoked up and Started at half past 7.o.clock and it has been very hot[.] we found Some part of the road preety good and the rest was Sloughs and mud holes and a Creek, we Crossed the Creek at ½ past 2. and Camped on its Bank at 3.o.clock[.] one waggon got Some damage done to day to it[.] the rest of the Company got a long well[.] our Company found one ox that was a little lame and two Cows as wild as Buck's[.] they have been left by the first Company’s[.] their is plenty of warter and feed but no wood near[.] <we have Come 12 miles to day[.]>

Monday July 28th[.] we Started again at ½ past 7.o.clock[.] the roads wher we Come were verry good[.] (at 10.o.clock we come across a grave and was very Sorry to here that it was a Sister killed by a Stampede[.] her name is Ellen Kingsl[e]y killed by being run over the Back[.] She belonged to the [Harry Walton/]Garden Grove Company[.] it is reported that they killed a bufflow and the Cattle Smelt the blood and just after they yoked up to Start the Stamped[e] Commenced) the morning was Cool and we traveled along well[.] in the after part of the day the roads was very bad and it was with difficulty that we got along for Some places was very hilly and So Sideling that our waggons <were near lapping over but we> got along Safe[.] their was Some of the Camp went to kill bufflow and they Staid untill late in the day and Some Come to Camp and left two of the Brethren back[.] they kept on after the bufflow and got lost and two Brethren went out with guns and a horn to Shoot and blow So that the lost ones might here the Sound and no where to Come, they were found about midnight and they have lost a horse[.] where we Camped to night is plenty of feed but no warter[.] we have Come to day 20 miles

tuesday July 29th[.] we turned out our Cattle at 4.o.clock to feed but they wanted warter So bad they would not feed and we drove them into the Carrell and yoked up and Started for feed and warter and we drove untill near 11.o.clock and found a good Camp ground[.] plenty of wood and warter but the feed was a little Short and when we rolled in to Camp Morris felps [Phelps] Company rolled out[.] Allreds are Camped about a quarter of a mile from us and they have lost 56 head of Cattle[.] the garden grove Company is Camped 6 miles ahead of us[.] the[y] have lost 70 head of Cattle all by Stampedes[.] we had a waggon broke to day just after we Started and it is repaired and ready for running again[.] when we Star[t]ed this morning we thought it was only 5 miles to warter but it turned out to be 10 miles and very rough roads

Wednesday July 30[.] we Staid in Camp all day for the purpose of Cooking and washing and getting our waggons in good running order

Thursday July 31st[.] we yoked up at 4.o.clock and Came 8 miles and Camped to let our Cattle feed and Started again at 5.o.clock in the evening and drove until near 9.o.clock over a very rough road[.] we Come 4. miles and Camped[.] one waggon broke down in the night and did not get into Camp, just as we all got into Camp it Commenced to rain tremendous[.] the thunder and lightning was very Severe[.] where we are Camped to night their is no feed but plenty of warter

Friday August 1st[.] we Started at half past eight.o.clock this morning and the roads were rough untill the afternoon and they then got better[.] we drove untill 5.o.clock and Camped near a Slough and just as we got Carrelled it Commenced to rain and rained very hard[.] we had no accident to day[.] all got a long well[.] we pased through two very large droves of Buffalow and have Seen as many as 6. and 8 thousand in a herde[.] we have Come to day 15 miles

Saturday August 2nd[.] we Started to day at half past Eight o clock and the road has Been first rate[.] we Come upon a herde of Buffalow about 10.o.clock and they Continued in Sight as far as the eye Could See until 2.o.clock[.] their was over 15 thousand of them[.] at ½ past 3.o.clock we Struck the old road but at what point it is not known[.] we are Camped to night on the plat [Platte River] Bottom[.] very good feed warter and timber[.] we have Come to day 20 miles[.] it has been Cool all day and at times a mist of rain would blow over us[.] it is now Cold enough for a large fire and a Big over Coat

Sunday July August 3rd[.] we laid by all day for to let our Cattle rest and to air our waggons[.] we had preching in the afternoon by Brother Cordon

monday July 6th of August[.] we Started on our journey at 8.o.clock and at noon we Come to the low Sandy Bluffs where <the> Rode and river runs to gether[.] we found our Selves then and at ½ past 5.o.clock we Struck Skung [Skunk] Creek and Camped near the road by the bluff about a mile from the Creek[.] (on Sundy night we had a meeting to Settle Some hard feelings that had arrisen in the Prest of Some of the Company belonging to the first ten with relation to the Captn. of that ten Showing partiality and the way it was Settled they removed him from the office and elected Brother James Lowe one of the Same ten to the be their Captn..) we found very good rolling to day and the day was Cool and pleasent[.] we Come 20 miles for the first on the old road

Tuesday August 5th[.] we Started this morning at 8.o.clock and Crossed Skunk Creek at a little before 9.o.clock and we traveled from Skunk Creek to the last timber on the north Side of the platt[.] we have made 27 miles to day[.] we found very good feed for our Cattle and lots of warter[.] the day was very fine and we roled a long first rate untill after noon and one of the waggons brok an axeltree by driving down a Short pitch but it is repaired and they are in Camp but it was Sun down before they got in. our Camp is generaly healthy

Wednesday August 6th[.] we roled out 8.o.clock and went 2 miles and Come to a deep wide Creek and we Commenced to Cross it and one ten got over Safe[.] the next Commenced and a few waggons of that got a Cross and then one broke down[,] Smas[h]ed a whele [wheel] all up[.] brok every spoke in it[.] the rest of the fifty made a new Crossing and got over Safe and roled a mile farther and Camped opposite the Cluster of I[s]lands with Some Small willow brush on it Spoken of in Cla[y]tons guide, 4.o.clock the waggon that was Smashed is got the wheele filled and in Camp

Thursday August 7th[.] we yoked up at 7.o.Clock and was a bout to Start when the word Come in to Camp that a buffalow was killed about a mile of[f] and we took Some Cattle and went and hauled it near the Camp and dressed it and all had a part of it[.] not even the feet nor hide was left by this time it got to be 8.o.clock and we roled out and had not gone far before two waggons was discovered to be on fire in the inside[.] it was occasioned by the brethren putting wood in the waggons that they had used to Cook their breakfast and had thrown warter on it thinking it was out[.] they put in their waggons and the air passing through Started the old Coals to going and the inside of the waggons were all in flames but it was got out with out any Serious accident, Some of the brethren got their hands burnt but not very Severe[.] we roled on then untill near 11.o.clock. brother Allen J[oseph]. Stout’s eldest boy [Charles] was Setting in the waggon driving and did not observe a bad place in the road time enough to get the waggon arround it and the waggon pitched into the hole and the Boy was thrown out and he fell under the fore wheels and it passed over his head and the hinde one run over his arm[,] leg and Side[.] he was brused up very much[.] Brother Cordon rode up imeaditly [immediately] and we done what we Could for him in the way of bathing him and Captn. Cordon Called on us to join with him in adminstering to him and we laid hands on him and his pain was removed So much that he went to Sleep and in 3 hours was eating[.] their was nothing broke about his body[.] we are now in Camp and he is eating his Supper and in a fair way for recovery[.] we traveled 22 miles to day and got into Camp at 7.o.clock <on bluff Creek[.]> not farther accident occured

Friday Aug 8th[.] we Started this morning at 8.o.clock and we had a very good day for roling[.] we Crossed Severel Creeks and Come a long without any accident and Camp at 5.o.clock on the upper Side of Rattlesnake Creek[.] we have made to day 20 miles

Saturday Aug 9th[.] we Started at 8.o.clock and traveled untill we Come to the east foot of Sandy Blufs where teams have to double[.] on the west of woolf Creek and Comming over that one tonge of a waggon was broke[.] no farther other accident occured and we Camped about a quarter of a mile beyond the west foot[.] we have made to day 18 miles

Sunday Aug 10th[.] we roled out at 9.o.clock and traveled 11 miles and Camped on the Bank of the platte river opposite Ash holler [Hollow] for the purpose of getting axeltree timber to Carry with us So that we Can be ready for a break down in Case one Should occurd

Monday Augst. 11th[.] we roled out at 8..clock and we had a very good day for rolling[.] their was a Box broke in one of the Brethren[‘s] wheele and it detained the Company about half an hour[.] no furthr accident occurred[.] we have made 15 miles to day and Camped on the Bank of the river[.] Before we Started this morning we had for to pack the Propperty belonging to mrs. [Lucy] Mark (wife of Ransom L. Mark who died July 20th) <across the river> as She intended to go back to the States with a government train that was Camped at the mouth of Auh Ash Holler[.] they were on their way to fort Levenworth. frome Laremie 8 days

Tuesday August 12th[.] we Started this morning at 8.o.clock and the morning was very Cold and Continued So the greater part of the morning and was Cool enough for one Coat on untill 12.o.clock[.] then the Sun Come out very hot and it was So untill near 3 and then it got Cooler and we are now Camped at the east foot of Cobble hills and their is not much feed for the Cattle[.] it is now 5.o.clock and Cold enough for an over Coat and a big fire and has the appearance of <being> a very Cold night[.] we have Come 7 miles to day

Wednesday August 13th[.] we was detained in Camp this morning on the account of Sickness about one hour and we roled out at 9.o.clock and 1. ten Stoped untill near 11.o.clock for the purpose of watang [waiting] on the Sister that was Sick[.] the other tens Crossed Cobble hils and Camped about ½ mile west of the ainchent [ancient] Bluffs or ruins for to wait untill the other ten Come up with us[.] about a quarter past 1 They roled in Sight and we yoked up and Started on our journey[.] when the the ten got up with us they told us that <the> Sister was better and had a fine Daughter[.] we traveled 10 miles further and Camped on the Bank of the platte[.] we have made 14 miles to day[.] at 9.o.clock the horn was blown for a meeting and we all assembled to See and here what was going on[.] Brother Cordon arose and Said the object I have in Calling this meeting is to answer af few questions that had been asked him repetidley [repeatedl.] If he was not agoing to make two Company’s of the one when we got to Larimie [Laramie,] and Some would ask in another way are you agoing to Select the Best and Strongest teams and Send them a head[.] in answere to theese questions he Said that this Company would all enter the valey of the great Salt Lake to gether unless wisdom dictated other ways and the nex[t] item of buisness was this[:] their are hundred and thousands of Indians betwen here and Larimie[.] they are assembling their for the Council with the officers of the United States with regard to Selling a right of way to the Government for the accomodation and good of the Emigrant[s] and he told the Brethren that he wanted to See everything that could be yoked to be yoked up and in the teams while we are passing through them and not to take any notice of them nor more than if they were not their and for every man to Stay by his team and keep joging along[.] then they will See all our Cattle in the teams and every man and team diligently engaged and will give them no Chance to Steel and it will let them no that we [are] diligent enough to take Care of them[.] Brother Cordon Spoke at Some length on the foregoing items and the meeting was dismised at 10.o.clock by prayer. at about 2.o.clock their was a Storm Come up and the thunder and lightning was terifying[.] the wind Blew allmost a hurican[.] the thunder Bolts appeared to Strike very Close by and Some of the Brethren Said they Smelt a very Sulphery Smell

Thursday August 14th[.] we Started this morning at a quarter past 8 o.clock and we have had a splended day for traveling[.] we have Come 20 miles to day and Camped about 3. miles below Chimney Rock[.] it is now ½ past 7.o.clock and their is a very heavy Cloud Comming up from the Southe and has the appearance of very heavy Storm

Friday August 15th[.] The Storm that we expected went round and did not touch us[.] we roled out this morning at half past 8[.] the morning was not as Cool as has been but Some what Cloudy[.] we traveled about 18 miles and Camped below Scot[t]s Bluffs[.] we had a good day for traveling allthough Some part of the day was quite warm[.] we all got along with out any accident[.] Brother Allen Stout Left an ox this morning belonging to the perpetual fund[.] he gave out Some 3 weeks ago and made out to drive him this far and would have drove him to the Valey but he would not leave the Carrell ground this morning[.] he run round and round again and then laid down and Brother Stout left him

Saturday August 16th[.] we Started this morning at Quarter past 8.o.clock[.] the road was very good and we have got along with out any accident and Camped on the river Bank about 12 miles above Scot’s Bluffs[.] we have made today 16 miles[.] a great many of our Cattle’s neck are Sore and one Brother’s Cattle’s necks are So Sore that they Can hardly Starte his waggon[.] when they Stop Some of the Brethren has tried white lead mixed with Linseed oil and spi[ri]ts of turpentine and that has Cured a great many of them[.] Some tries washing their neck’s every night after they are turned out of the yoke but that appears to make them worse[.] we have now tried another plan and that is take a Bar of lead and beat it out wide enough to Cover the yoke w[h]er[e] the neck rubs and that Seems to heal them up directly[.] Some have tried it when the Cattle’s neck’s have been Blood raw and they have worked them all the time and their neck’s are well,

Sunday August 17th[.] we Stoped here all day to rest our Cattle and to Cook and wash and in the afternoon we had Some preaching from Captn. Cordon and we all felt very much edified[.] Some of the Brethren Spoke at Some length and we had a good time to gether, Since we have been on the road we have had 3 emigrants added to our list and their names are as follows[:] Maria Baddaley Born July 29th[,] Mary Elizabeth Steel Born Augst. 10th[,] Zilah Jane Player Born Augst. 13th[.] they all belong to the Second ten

Monday Augst. 18th[.] we Started this morning at ½ past 8.o.clock and we traveled very Slow on the account of Sickness and at 11.o.clock we Stoped to rest the Sick[.] about a quarter of an hour, the person that is So dangerously ill is the wife of Brother Jms. [James] Booth[.] She is very low with the Consumption[.] we Started on and roled untill ½ past one.o.clock and then Stoped for dinner and Captn. Cordon was almost a minde to Carrell the Company So that She might rest easey and then again he thought that She might lay So all day and perhaps two days and then he told us to role on again[.] we traveled along Slowly untill 4.o.clock and then the train Stoped about 10 minuets and She died[.] we Carrelled imeaditly along Side of the road[.] plenty of wood and abut a mile frome the river[.] there is also a Brother Sick with Something like the dumb Ague and fever[.] he has also a Severe Bowel Complaint[.] their was a Brother running down with the Blood flux and he was administered to yesterday and to day is a great deal better[.] there are also a great many Sore mouth’s and lips a mongst us but dose not appear to be dangerous[.] we have made eleven miles to day and are Camped opposite the Bluf which Clayton’s guide Speaks about assending to See Larimie peak frome (Brother Booth’s wife’s name is Cathrine Booth aged 32 years)

Tuesday Aug 19th[.] we Started this morning at 7.o.clock and the morning was quite warm and towards the middle of the day it got to be quite hot and we then had very heavy rolling[.] we Come to raw hide Creek [Rawhide Creek] at 2.o.clok and we then had a tolerable good road untill 4.o.clock and we then Camped about 8. miles from the fort[.] we have mad[e] 18 miles to day[.] we are about ½ a mile from a S[i]oux village <and> as Soon as we Camped Crowds of them flocked to See us and to get Some thing to eate[.] [--] their was 3 amongst them that appeared to be the head men of the Camp[.] we fed them and they appeared to be Satisfied[.] they asked for our Cheif as Soon as they Come in Camp and we introduced Brother Cordon to them and they pased around the pipe of peace and all Seamed to enjoy themselves very much

Wednesday Aug 20th[.] at 2.o.clock this morning we were aroused from our wagons by a Stampede[.] we all run around them and got them in the Carrell very easey[.] they all Seemed to get quiet drectley [directly] and Some of us went to bed again and Before 9.o.clock they ran again but [they] did not Seeme to be as much fritend [freightened] as they did at first[.] the Brethren got them in the Correlle again and they then were quiet[.] no one Could tell what Started them[.] Some Said it was a wolf, and Some a dog and others Said they got the Sent[scent] of the Indian’s[.] So it appears that they all knowed and <Still> no body knowed from the remarks that were made[.] we yoked up and roled out at 7.o.clock and Crossed the river at Larimie at 11.0.clock[.] we then went to the fort to get Supplies and they Charged us any price they had a minde[.] they Charged us $4.00 a gall for golden Syrup molasses and 40. cts per lb for Sugar and 15.18. and $20.00 per hundred for flour and Some of the Brethren had to go way with out any for they were not able to pay Such a price and the Store keeper extortioned on every thing that the Brethen wanted[.] we Started frome their at 1.o.clock and Come about 5 miles and Camped along Side of the river[.] not much feed But plenty of muddy warter[.] we have made 18 miles to day and Camped at 3.o.clock[.] Brother Baddaly [George Baddley] the one that was So Sick when Sister Booth died is worse and Seems to get weaker[.] the rest of the Company are generally healthy

Thursday Augst. 21st[.] we Started this morning at half past 8 o.clock and we traveled the fore part of the day Over Sand hils first and then a tolerable good road untill we Struck the rook that Clayton Speak’s about being So dangerous to waggons on the account of a Short turn in the road[.] we then have had a good road all day although it was hilly[.] we have Come 16 miles to day and Camped where there is <not much feed> but plenty of wood and a Creek that Seems to be Supplied by a Spring for it is very good warter and alamos [--] almost as Cold as ice warter[.] we all have got along to day without any accident

Friday Aug 22nd[.] we Started this morning at 8.o.clock[.] our road to day has been good but very dusty[.] the only thing that occurred to day while traveling was two tires Come of[f] but they did not detain the Company[.] we all Camped about the Same time[.] we have Come 18 miles to day and Camped at ½ past 3.o.clock near a Creek[.] plenty of wood[,] warter and Splended feed[.] Soon as we Camped every man was in buisness Some repairing wheles and Some getting the tires ready to Sett and Some went to Cutting wood for to make Charcoal and our Blacksmith are getting their forge up ready for work and ever[y] Body that is not on duty as herdsmen are engaged at Some thing and all Seems to be life and animation and the Brethren while they were Swinging their axes and falling the treese would yell out with delight and make the woods ring again, and if any person had seen them that were not acquainted with them nor their Circumstances would naturally Suppose that they followed it for a living for it Come as natural to them as putting their vituals in their mouth and our Captn. is as full of work as any of us and any Body to look at him and then at us would think that we were all Captns. for he looks So much like the rest of us[,] for go around the Camp when any thing is going on like worke and you would See him in his Shirt Sleves and Black hands and dirty face and into it up to his eyes as the Saying is and it nearley turns out to be the fact

Saturday Augst. 23nd[.] we Started Stoped this morning [-----] to Cut and Sett tires and our Captain appointed a Committee of 3 to examine the Company and they examined every wagon and those that wantend tire Cut and welded they Sent them to the Black Smiths and those that wanted hooping and tire Sett they told them to go at it and get it done fore we wanted to Starte as Soon as possible and in less than an hour every man was at work that Could work and our Brother’s the Blacksmith’s worked very hard all day and kept at it untill 9.o.clock at night and they Could not finish all of them So they Stoped work untill Sunday morning and all the Brethren worked hard <all day>. Brother’s [James] Lowe and Willson our whele rights were buisley [busily] engaged all day and they have a wheele to finish yet

Sunday morning Augst. 24,th[.] our Brethren are at work again and the anvil is ringing with the ten pound ten and Some of the Brethren are getting out axeltres and Some Setting tires and the wheele rights are at work at the wheele and it Seems to be a day of work instead of rest[.] 6.o.clock at evening our Brethren are Still at work and one of them is Burning a tar hill[.] it will take them untill dark to get ready for roling

Monday Augst. 25th[.] we Started this morning at half past 7.o.clock and traveled over a very good road[.] we Struck the platt[e] at noon and then roled on untill 6.o.clock at evening our Brethren are Still at work and one of them is Burning a tar hill[.] it will take them untill dark to get ready for roling

Monday Augst. 25th[.] we Started this morning at half past 7.o.clock and traveled over a very good road[.] we Struck the platt [Platte] at noon and then roled on untill 5.o.clock and Carrelled where their was no grass plenty of timber and warter. <we have made 37 miles to day>[.] after we Started this morning two of the Brethren went Back for to hunt for a lost Cow that Belonged to our Company and they found her at ½ past 10.o.clock and Before they got into Camp it was 12.o.clock at night[.] they got along Safe But was very tired

Tuesday Augst. 26th[.] we Started this morning at 8.o.clock and we have traveled over hills and hollers all day and Some of the road was very rough and one of the Brethren got a tonge Broke[.] the rest got along with out any accident[.] we have Come 20 miles to day and Camped where there is not much feed and the warter is a good half mile off and there is not much timber near but plenty by going a quarter of mile

Wednesday Augst. 27th[.] we Started this morning at 5.o.clock and traveled 8 miles and Camped about three hour’s to let our Cattle feed and get warter[.] we rolled from their at half past 12.o.clock and rolled 8 miles more and Camped on the Bank of Fourche Boise river[.] the grass is Short But very good[.] we all got along to day very well[.] their was a Cow and an ox gave out[.] the Cow had been worked down and the ox was So lame that he Could not go any farther[.] Brother Baddaly is about the Same[.] the rest of the Camp is generally healthy[.] we have made 16 miles to day

Thursday Augst. 28th[.] we Started this morning at half past 8.o.clock and we traveled without any accident untill one o.clock and [-] at Deer Creek we passed Allreds Company[.] they were repairing waggon’s[.] just after we passed them their was an axletree discovered to be Broke in the first ten. Captn. Cordon thought it best for the ten to Stop and form a Carrell and make an axletree and the rest of the Company rolled on with the determination of Camping as Soon as they Come to feed and warter and wait untill the ten got up and all would then roll to gether[.] <we Camped about half an hour after we have made 12 miles[.]> they got their waggon repaired against dark and they rolled up to the Carrell at 7.o.clock

<Friday morning Aug 29th> and the Brethren were not ready to Start on the account of Some of the herdsman Comming <in> to Camp for Breakfast and leaving part of the Cattle on the opposite Side of the river instead of Staying with them untill the horn Blew for the herde to Come in and by that means the Company was belated one hour[.] Captn. Cordon ordered the first ten to rolle on and the rest would follow as Soon as the Cattle were d[r]ove into the Carrelle[.] we was all rolling at half past 9.o.Clock and Come along with out any accident and traveled 16 miles and Camped about half mile frome the deep gulph Spoken of in Clayton’s guide[.] it has been very dusty all day and Some times we Could hardly See our teams[.] as Soon as we got Carrelled Some of the Brethren got went to Seetting tires and they got them done and ready for roling by half past 8.o.clock and at 9.o.clock it got to be quite Cold and is almost a freezing Cold evening

Saturday Augst. 30th[.] the day Broke Clear and Cold and when we got up in Camp we found ice in our Buckets and pans and it was an eighth of an inch thick[.] we rolled out at 8.o.clock and traveled until dinner time and turned our Cattle out to Bait below the upper ferry[.] we Started again at 2.o.clock and Crossed the river and come about 4. miles and Camped about ½ mile frome the river[.] we have Come 12 miles to day[.] just after we Camped three men Come in frome the mountains and told us that Captn. Easton and Company was robed of their Horses and provisions and they were in a destitute Condition

Sunday August 31st[.] we Started this morning at half past 9.o.clock and Come 8 miles and warte[r]d our Cattle and then drove about 7 miles farther and Camped about 3 miles Below Rock Avenue and we have Come 15 miles to day[.] at 8.o.clock. the horn was Blown and we all assembled to Settle Some hard feelings that had arrisin[.] the Brest Brother [Henry] Gooldsbrough [Goldsbrough] and his ten with regard to doing duty and Severel of them Spoke with regard to it and it was finaly Settled by Brother Cordon giving us all a good lecture with regard to attending to our duty as respects herding and guarding[.] Several important Items of Buisness were brought up and disposed of and we dismissed by prayer[.] all determined to Stay to gather <for> as we Started to gather [together] we would enter the Valey to gather and a Spirit of union Seemes to be with all the Camp[.] our Sick is Better and our company is generaly healthy

Monday September 1st[.] we Started this morning at 5.o.clock and drove untill eleven and Camped at the willow Springs to let our Cattle feed and get warter and Started again at 2.o.clock and traveled untill ½ past 5.o.clock and Camped on the Side of the Creek that is 300 yds frome the road[.] their was a Cow gave out to day and was left behinde, the Company all got along Safe[.] we have made 18 miles to day

Tuesday Sept. 2nd[.] we Started on our journey this morning at half past 8.o.Clock and <traveled> untill we Come to the Solaraetus [salaratus] lake and Stoped untill we Could get Some to Carry with us but their was none worth getting So we drove on about a mile and a half farther and Come to Some <that was> first rate on the South Side of the road[.] we laid in our Saleraetus their and drove on untill 4.o.clock and Camped along Side of Independence Rock near the Bank of the Sweet warter [Sweetwater] river[.] we have traveled 15 miles to day

Wednesday Sept. 3nd[.] we rolled out this morning at 8.o.clock and got along very well until we past the devel’s gate [Devil’s Gate] and then we took a left hand road and it was Sandy and very heavy and the <wind> Blew tremendious hard which made it very heavy drawing for our Cattle and was So dusty that at times we Could not See a number of our Cattle laid down with fatigue and we would get them up and rolle a little farther and they would lay down again[.] So we worked that way for a bout an hour or two and finely we got out of it and Camped about 7. miles frome devels gate where there is plenty of feed and warter but no wood near

thursday Sept. 4th[.] we Started this morning at 9.o.clock and our road lay over Sand hills and hollers and and very rough ground until about 1.o.clock and then we Struck the old road about 12 miles frome the devels gate[.] [illegible text] we rolled on frome their tolerable well although a great number of our Cattle was tired and Camped where we leave the old road and ford the river twice and we have made a cut on of about 9 miles by takeing the lef[t] hand rode[.] on Wednesday after we left the Devels gate it has not been traveled very much But a great number has been disapointed by thinking it was a Cut off but it has Cost nearly a whole days travel for nothing

Friday Sept. 5th[.] we Started this morning at 9.o.clock and traveled until near 2.o.clock and then we were delayed about an hour and half by a party of indians[.] their was a thousand of them and they Called themselves the Sankes[.] they appeared to be very friendly for their was a Steer and a cow went of[f] with them and they drove them both back to us again[.] after they got by we rolled on and Camped on the Sweet warter Bottom about a mile from where we Cross the river between the rocky ridges <and> our cattle was nearly giving out when we got into Camp

Saturday Sept. 6th[.] we Started this morning at half past 8.o.clock and got along very well for about 6 miles[.] then their was a wheele gave out and the waggon had to Stop for about 3 hours[.] we Come about 4 miles farther and Camped on the Bank of the Sweet warter <and> Captn. Cordon Sent one of the wheeles belonging to his waggon for to help the Crippled one into Camp[.] we have made 10 miles to day

Sunday Sept. 7th[.] the morning <Broke> Clear and Cold and we have plenty of ice in Camp and the fire feeles first rate[.] 9.o.clock in the evening the horn was blown and we assembled our Selves to gather and Brother Cordon arose and made Some very approiarte [appropriate] remarks with regard to our Situation at the present tim[e] and then Called on the Brethren to make Such remarks as they Seen proper and the prevailing Idea was Concerning our Cattle and Some were for Stoping <at> every patch of grass and Some was for turning them out at 2.o.clock in the morning and Some for one thing and Some was for another and fineley the meeting broke up and nothing was done with regard to our Cattle. after about two hours talking

Monday Sept. 8th[.] we Started this morning at 8.o.clock and in the fore part of the day we had very heavy rolling and in the after part we had very good hard rodes and we Camped at 5.o.clock on the Banks of the Sweet warter at ford No 5 and <we have made 16 miles to day[.]> just after we Camped their was a very Cold wind Blew from the South west and the way the Coats and Shawl’s were put on was not Slow and <we> made as big fire as we could to keep us warm[.] we met Brother Bianhysell to day and he Brought us good news frome the Valey[.] he was in good health and good Spirits and Seemed to be going on his way very Comfortable—and with great Speed

tuesday Sept. 9th[.] we Started this morning at half past 8.o.clock and traveled 5 miles and then Stoped where their was Some very good feed[.] about 2 hours we Started again frome their and drove until we Come to where the road leaves the river and Camped[.] we have made 10 miles to day

Wednesday Sept. 10th[.] the morning is very Cool but there is no ice in Camp but So near it that the frosty wind pinches our nose very much[.] Thursday Sept. 11th we Started this morning at 9.o.clock and Commenced to assend the long hill frome the river and when we got about half way up it one of the Brethren tires was about to Come off and we Stoped abut a quarter of an hour to wedge it and then we rolled on untill we Come to the rocky ridges where it is So dangerous to waggons and one of the Brethren had the misfortune to Break a reach which detained us Some two hours[.] [-] we then rolled on about one and a half miles farther and the tire that Stoped us at first detained us a gain[.] we then went on and in a bout a quarter of an hour he was discovered to be be hinde Some distance but Still Coming <and> by this time the main part of the fifty was out of Sight and but 4 waggons were with him and about 2 miles frome Strawberry Creek his tire Broke and he had to Stop alone until near 9.o.clock and got and when the waggons were Carrelled Brother [James] lowe the Captn. of the <first> ten that the Broken down waggon belonged to went to every waggon b in his ten and he Could only get two men out of it that would go and fetch the Broken waggon into Camp and they had to pack a wheele 6 miles[.] we are Camped on the Branch of the Sweet warter[.] plenty of willows and warter but no feed for our Cattle[.] we have made 15 miles to day

Thursday Sept 11th[.] this morning was very Cold and their was plenty of ice in Camp and <it was> a quarter of an inch thick[.] we all Stoped until 12.o.Clock to day to repair the waggon that was Broke yesterday[.] it belongs to Allen J. Stout and the Captn. of the fifty ordered the freight taken out of Stouts waggon and it was ploughs and they were buried in the Bank of the Branch of the sweet warter about 2 rods above the ford. they had bords laid under and over them to keep them off of the ground and to keep the dirt frome packing in on them[.] we made a form of a grave and put a head Bord up and on the head Bord was written with Black ink[:] W Plour aged 20 (for their was 20 plougs) Sept 11th 1851 and under it was written With red chalk[:] Cordon’s fifty[.] we rolled out from their after dinner and drove 7 miles and Camped at the upper Crossing of the Sweet warter

Friday Sept 12th[.] we Started this morning at 8.o.clock and it was very Cold and it rained the most part of the morning and we Stoped on the South pass to take dinner and it Commenced to rain a gain and we drove on untill we Come to the passific [Pacific] Springs and then it hailed a little and Cleared of quite plesent[.] we are Camped about a quarter of a mile above the Crossing of Passific Creek[.] there is [-] a number of our Cattle beginning to give out but we have plenty of feed for them to night but it is Some mirey and a few of the Cattle has got mired So bad that the Brethren has had to pull them out[.] we have made 14 miles to day

Saturday Sept 13th[.] we Started this morning at 8.o.clock and we got along pretty well[.] <considering the start we had for just after we rolled out two of the Brethren got to fighting like game cocks[.]> we have had a good road all day[.] one ox laid down and died in about half an hour and four others gave out[.] the rest of the Company Come along Safe But the Cattle were very tired[.] we are Camped to night on the old pioneer road about 2 miles frome the junction of the California and Oregon roads[.] there is no warter and the feed is allmost as Scarse as hen’s teeth but plenty of Sage Brush for fuel[.] we have made 13 miles to day

Sunday Sept 14th[.] we Started this morning at 6.o.clock and drove about 5 miles and their was an axeltree broke by another waggon running against the hub of the wheele but the Company was not detained for their was an axletree allready to put in and we lost no time in doeing it[.] [-] we rolled on 4 miles farther and Camped on the Bank of little Sandy[.] plenty of willows[,] not much warter and grass Scarce[.] we have made 9 miles to day,

monday Sept 15th[.] we rolled out this morning at 6.o.clock and found the road very good but dusty, about 8.o clock we met Brother Shoore on his way Back to meet his wife and as luck would have it She was with us on her way to the Valey but in a weak State for She has been Sick Some days. we rolled on until we Come to Big Sandy and we forded the Streem and Camped on the west Side of it[.] plenty of warter and willows[.] grass Scarce, we have made 9. miles to day and tuesday Sept 16th we Started Camped about dinner time, at night the horn was blown for meeting and it Commenced to Snow and then turned to rain but it did not Break up the meeting[.] Brother Cordon arose and Said[,] [“]Brethren I Called this meeting to night to take into Consideration the propriety or the none propriety of Breaking up and traveling in tens[."] and he Spoke over [-] great Some length of time upon that Subject and their was Several made remarks with regard to it[.] then a motion was made to rolle to gether and it was put and Sustained and Captn. Cordon Said all Contrary minded rolle out in the morning by themselves[.] and he Spoke with regard to our Cattle giving out and the Brethren feeding their Bread Stuffs to them when their was Some familes in the Company that needed all the Bread Stuffs we had to Spare and their was Some that have Cooked up their last and we have got nearly 3 weeks journey to perform yet[.] and he told the brethren to keep it in their waggons and not feed it to their Cattle for we Should need all we have for our Selves and he made Some more very approriht [appropriate] remarks with regard to our Company and then the meeting dismissed

tuesday Sept 16th[.] we Started out this morning at half past 8.o.clock and all rolled untill dinner time and the team that was on the head of the train did not go fast enough for Some of the Brethren So they drove around him and rolled on to Big Sand[y] and when they got their Captn. Cordon would not Strike a Carrell for them and they asked him what Shall we do[?] he answered them Carrell where you like[.] So when we all got in their was 2 Carrell’s and he made neither of them[.] <we have made 16 miles to day.> after we got Camped the horn was Blown for meeting and Brother Cordon arose and Said that their was hard feelings with the brethren and that a Sepparation of this Company was about to take place and Severel talke[d] with regard to Spliting up and it was motioned that we go in tens and Carried unamious [unanimous.] then the journal was read up to the present time and a vote of thanks was taken for Captn. Cordon and the Clerk of the Company for their Services Since we Started and then the meeting Broke up

wednesday Sept 17th[.] the first ten rolled out this morning and all but four waggons and three of them was So heavy loade that they had to Stay behinde[.] they belonged to Miles Anderson and were loaded with ploughs[.] the other was a broken down team and Broken down waggon and the Brethren took their portion of freight out of it and rolled a head[.] the first ten has Connected with it 4 waggons that belonged to the third ten and expect two more in Camp to night and we Shall rolle to gether as the first ten[,] James Lowe Captn. and John D[aniel].T[hompson]. Mcallister [McAllister] Clerk[.] we have made 13 miles to day and Camped about half past 2.o clock on the west Side of the green river about 2 miles above where the road leaves it[.] at night their was 4 waggons come up inStead of 2 and they all drove into Carrell after we Camped and got Supper. we rung a large Cow bell and the Brethren all got to gether and Brother James Lowe arose and Said[,] well Brethren we have met to night under percular [peculiar] Circumstances for we have here the majority of the first ten and 4 waggons of the third ten and 2 of the 4th ten[.] he Said it is recqesite [requisite] that we travel in order and as we have in our midst the Captn. of guard and the Captn. of herde and the Clerk of the fifty and men that are willing to Stand to one another we Can roll in perfe[c]t order[,] peace and quietness[.] it was move[d] and carried unamious that we move to gether as the first ten and that James Lowe the Captn. of the first ten be Still Sustained as the Captn. of this ten or Company[.] and it was moved that William Holt be Sustained as Captn. of the guard and Edwin Trimmer be Sustained as the Captn. of the Herde and that Benjamin Allen Be Sustained as Captn. of the Hunters and it was moved that <the> record of our travels Still be kept and that John D.T McAllister Be Sustained as Clerk of the Company[.] and it was motioned and Carried unamious that every waggon take its turn in leading the Compay and if a man has two or more wagons that he leades the Comps as many days as he has wagons and all drop behinde to gether[.] and if a Brother wants a waggon to leade for his waggon that he Shall have the privilege of doing So and Both drop Back to gether[.] and it was moved alls[o] that if a Brother drove around the waggon that was a head of him that he Should go be hinde the Company 4 day’s[.] it was Carried unamious[.] it was also move that we attend to our prayers as usuall[.] it was alls [also] Carried unamious and every vote that was taken their was not a dissenting voice and union prevailed throughout the meeting and Captn. lowe made Some very approiate remark with regard to our journey and then the meeting adjourned By prayer

thursday Sept the 18th[.] we Started this morning at ½ past 7.o.clock and our Cattle Stept a long very well and we traveled over hill’s and hollers all day and had to take two round about roads on account of Bad places in the old road and we lost about 2 miles travel by it[.] we Camped to night on the Bank of Blacks fork and we have made 20 miles to day[.] at 8.o.clock the Bell was rung and we assembled to gether for prayers and then retired to our waggons

Friday Sept 19th[.] we Started this morning at Sunrise and drove 3 miles So as to get Better feed for our Cattle and just after we Camped <at 7> this morning[,] an ox belonging to Brother Thomas [J.] hall died and the Brethren are a going to open him to See what killed him if they Can for he appeared to be healthy when we Camped and looke liked the Best ox in the Crowd[.] we opend him and it was decided that he had Broke a Blood vessel but when or where it was not known for his melt was as rotten as punk and <it> appeared to be a lot of congealed Blood in the form of a melt[.] we rolled out again at ½ past Eleven O clock and drove to Black’s fork Second time[.] we have made to day 5 miles[.] just after we Camped McAllister Commenced to put le[a]ther shoes on his ox’s feet and he was quite well and hearty when we Commenced [to] do it and as Soon as we got him Shod he Breathed his last[.] he killed himself by exerting and flouncing about to get Loose

Saturday Sept 20th[.] we was aroused this morning by the Shouting of the guard for we intended to make an early Start and he was determined to get us up early enough for it and just after we turned out it Commenced to thunder and Lightning and has the appearance of a rany day[.] we Started on our journey at half past 8.o clock and it rained nearly all day at intervals[.] we found very good roads and we drove untill 4.o clock and then we Come to Black’s fork fourth time[.] we Crossed it and Camped on its Bank <at 20 minutes of 5.[.]> about half a mile above the ford plenty of grass wood and warter[.] <we have made 15 miles to day[.]>

Sunday Sept 21st[.] at 6.o.clock this morning it Commenced to rain and Continued So untill 10.o.clock[.] we then yoked up and Started at half past ten o clock and the roads were very Slippery and about 11.o clock one of the Cows that was in the lead team Sprained her Shoulder and it detained the Camp about a quarter of an hour[.] we then Started a gain and rolled a quarter of a mile farther and a wheele run off of one of the wagons and that detained us a half hour longer[.] we then Started on our way and the roads by this time were nice and dry and we rolled up to Bridger at Sun down[.] we have made 14 miles to day[.] the feed is very good here and warter and willows plenty

monday Sept 22nd[.] we Started this morning at 8. o clock and our road lay over a Splendid Country and we rolled on tolerable well all day and we Come to mud[d]y fork at four. o.clock and we are Camped on its west Bank about half mile above the ford[.] we have made 13 miles to day

tuesday Sept 23th[.] we Started this morning at half past eight o.clock and found very good road but hilly untill just before we [--] left the old road and then it was good rolling and Continued So until we Come on the old road again[.] we left the old road where it desends from the Summit of high ridge over rough rocks about half way down it and we Struck the old road a gain about a mile from the west foot of the dividing ridge Between the warters of the great Basin and the Colerado [Colorado] river and then we Camped[.] found plenty of feed <and> wood but warter rather Scarce[.] we have made 14 miles to day

wednesday Sept 24th[.] we rolled out this morning at 6.o.clock and traveled over [-] a very preety [pretty] Country and <we had good roads> until we Struck Sulpher [Sulphur] Creek and then we had rough roads untill we Come to Bear river and we Camped on the west Side of it <for to cook and wash> about three quarters of a mile Below the ford[.] we have made 7 miles to day

Thursday Sept 25th[.] we Started this morning at 8.o clock and rolled along first rate untill eleven o.Clock and then Mr. Stephen [Keiser] Muir was run over by his own waggon in attempting to get out of it while it was rolling[.] the for[e] wheele run over his hand and ankel and the hinde one run over his thighs[.] his hand and ankel was very much Bruised but as good luck would have it no Bones were Broken[.] we Bathed and dressed his wounds as much as we Could or as much as our Circumstances would permit and then Crossed yellow Creek and rolled on with out any farther accident until 6.o.clock and we then Camped this morning opposite the Cold spring on the right of the road two miles Beyond Cache Cave[.] we have Come 18 miles to day[.] their was a Brother Steward [Stewart] that got offended at Some of the Comp. or all of it and he did not Carrell with us to night But kept on his way and paid no attention to our Camp whatever[.] well Sucsess to him and his[.] he has Spited no Body But him Self

Friday Sept 26[.] we Started this morning at 9.o clock and our road was very muddy and Slippery, for it had Been raining all night, and our Cattle Could hard[l]y keep their feet and we had a very Bad road all day[.] But we got along with out any accident and Camped on echo Creek about 6 miles frome the weber river[.] we have made 14 miles to day and it ha

Saturday Sept 27th[.] we Started this morning at 8.o clock and the road appeared to be worse than it had Been[,] for at Some of the Crossings our Cattle Could Scarsely Stand up and it was with Some difficulty that they pulled our waggons up and So it Continued untill 12.o.clock[.] then we had good roads all the way to the mouth of the kanion [canyon] and we have had a very good road all the way Since we Struck the river and we ar Camped to night at the East foot of long hill about 2 miles from the ford of Weber river[.] after we Camped to night we went a head to examine the road and we found that it wanted working very much[.] So we went at it and made a good road for a mile or more and we <made> quite an improvement for their was one place that was So Sideling it was dangerous for a waggon to pass and we Cut an upper track for the [--] wheele <to> run in and it makes a very good road and another place was a jump of[f] and we made that first rate[.] and if every Company would repair the road a little we would have quite a good road to the valey of the great Salt Lake[.] we have made to day 12 miles

Sunday Sept 28[.] we Started this morning at 8.o clock and our road lay over a tract of roleing Country for about 2 miles[.] then we Commenced to assend a very high hill and it was a very rough road[.] But we got up it with out any accident and we Commenced to decend about 12.o clock and when we Struck kanion [Canyon] Creek a tire broke belonging to J D. McAllister’s waggon and the waggon had to Stop untill the rest of the Compy got into Camp and then they Sent a wheele Back to fetch up the broken wagon[.] and when it got into Camp it was quite dark and the Captn. and Bretheren got a plate of iron with two holes in it and heated the tire and punched two holes in it and riveted the two to gather and put a pair of clasp on while the wheele tire was hot and it has ma[de] a tight job of it[.] we meet A Y Babbitt and family on their way Back easte[.] all well and getting along first rate

monday Sept. 29[.] we Started this morning at half past 8.o clock and we got along preety well and about 11.o.clock we meet <part of> the officers of utah on their way back to the States[.] at about 1.o.clock we Commenced to assend the next to the last mountain and when we had got half way up it the team belonging to Thomas Hall gave out and Could not go any farther[.] and the rest of the Comp[an]y [-] got to the Summit of the mountain just as Severe Storm Come up and they had to decend right away for the Cattle Could not Stand[.] and for fear of a turn over we went down and Camped on Browns Creek and Brother halls waggon had to Stay all night on the other Side of the mountain[.] just after we Camped it rained very hard which made the road very Slippery

tuesday Sept. 30[.] we Sent team Back to help Brother Hall over the mountain and he got into Camp about 10.o.clock and it rained imeaditly[.] we then rolled on untill we Come to the foot of the last mountain and we had to Camp their for the mountain to dry So that we Could go up it

wednesday October 1st[.] we got our Breakfast this morning before day Break and got our Cattle up and was yoked up By Sun rise and we doubled team and walked right up the mountain and all was up by 10.o.clock[.] we then Commenced our decent and got down Safe and rolled into the valey with out any material damage[.] McAllister forried hounds was Broke on last Creek[.] that is all the damage that was done[.] when we Saw the Valey our hearts rejoiced very much[.] we all halted on the Bench took a good By frome Each other and Separated

 

John D T McAllister Clerk

 

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