Transcript

Transcript for "Murder of Col. A. W. Babbitt, Secretary of Utah Territory," New York Daily Times, 17 Nov. 1856

Murder of Col. A. W. Babbitt, Secretary of Utah Territory.
From the Cleveland Herald, Nov. 6.

Rumors reached the States, some weeks since, that Colonel BABBITT, a prominent Mormon, and Secretary of Utah Territory, had been murdered by the Indians. An arrival of a Salt-Lake train, on Sunday, Oct. 26, at Council Bluffs, confirms this report. Captain HAWLEY, who had charge of this train, got the facts at "Sweet Water," which is a station about 200 miles west of Fort Laramie.

The Indians had come to the Fort, and reported that twelve of them had attacked Colonel BABBITT while one of his men was away, and after the Colonel had fired his double-barreled gun and his revolvers, one of the Indians crept stealthily behind the wagons and tomahawked the Colonel. The Indians said that the Colonel fought like a grizzly bear.

When at Fort Kearney, Captain HAWLEY learned that Major WHARTON had in his possession the papers (including a draft of $8,000) and some of his hair. The watch was obtained by a Frenchman from the Indians. Altogether about 18 whites have been killed. Colonel BABBITT was on his return from Washington to resume his duties as Secretary, and had with him a valuable collection of books, astronomical instruments, and was supposed to have a large sum of money.

Colonel BABBITT was formerly a resident of Amherst, Lorain County. His father was a blacksmith in that town, and was one of its early settlers. The son was an untutored, active, smart boy—to use a familiar expression, was very "tonguey"—and when a young man became a convert to Mormon doctrines, through the influence of a protracted Mormon meeting held in Amherst. Mr. BABBITT became a Mormon preacher, having joined the sect at Kirkland, Lake County, and has followed the destiny of this strange people up to its present habitation at Salt Lake. Col. BABBITT, by his native talent, industry and perseverance, has risen to distinction in Utah, and was Secretary of the Territory.

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