Transcript

Transcript for Reuben Miller journals, 1848-1849, Journal, 1849 June-September

The first Wagon crossed the missouri May 30th 1849

West side of the Missouri River near Winter Quarters. Camp of Israel Monday morning June 4th, 1849

The camp was called togather by Pres. G[eorge]. A[lbert]. Smith which consisted of about 75 waggons. About 50 more Still remaining on the opposite Shore of the river waiting to Cross over. After Some apropriate and usefull remarks by the Pres. he proposed that the two Camps be organized into a Company of one hundred And be devided into two fifties. This he Said would include the whole, And have a tendency to prevent our people going out in detached parties, and consequently be exposed to dangers and hardships. He proposed that both companies Camp togather at least five hundred miles. And recommended as far as fort Bridger; and that the first fifty organized move on to the Elk Horn River, And build a raft And cross over if posable by the time the Second company got up. He enjoined it a duty upon those that were experienced to assist those that were not.

The President then recommended Samuel Gully for captain of the whole, or both divisions. Which was nominated and carried unanimously. He then nominated W[illia]m Miller Captain of the first division of fifty. Which was carried unanimously. He then nominated W[illia]m Hyde Captain of the Second Division of fifth which was carried unamiously [unanimously]. He then nominated O[rson]. Spencer President of the whole Camp, which was carried unanimously. He then nominated William [F.] Cahoon for first Counselor to Pres. Spencer, And Father Gidean [Gideon] Brownell for Second[.] Carried unanimously[.] He then apointed Reuben Miller, clerk for the second division of fifty. and J[ohn].H. [William] Baxter to keep minutes of all important ocurrances on the journey to send back to Elder O. Hyde for publication.

To the company he said, When you get to the mountains send in an express to the Valley that preparations may be made to receive you and place to settle, chosen settle if necessary.

The first division of fifty being organized They took up their line of march for the Elk Horn river on the morning of the 5th of June.

The second division of fifty succeeded in getting across the Missouri on the Evening of the 6th and camped for the night at the same place.

On the morning of the 7th under a partial Organization the Camp mooved out about 7 miles and Camped for the night on a high roling Prairie. In the evening the camp was called togather by Pres. Spencer, Captains Gideon and Hyde. After some apropriate and usefull remarks by Capt. [Leonard] Gurley [Rice], t[e]aching the duty and faithfullness of each individual composing the Camp. He proceeded to read the rules and regulations adopted by the Emigrating Saints in 1848 which were unanimously adopted. And are as follows[:]

1st That each ten Shall travel ahead alternately according to their numbers.

2nd That all lost property when found Shall be brought to the captains of fiftys quarters.

3rd That all dogs shall be tied up at dark to prevent the annoyance of the guard.

4th That no man be allowed to leave the Camp by himself or without the consent of the Captain.

5th That it shall be the duty of the Captain of ten to instruct their men to attend to their family prayers at the Sounding of the horn.

6th That it Shall be the duty of the Captains of fiftys to see that the Guard shall be placed arround the Camp at 1/2 past eight o.c.[o'clock] of each night to relieve the Captains of the herd whose duty it shall be at the Sounding of the horn in the morning with his men & boys exempt from guard duty to take charge of the herd untill the night guard is posted

7th That the sounding of the horn shall be the Signal for the camp to arise and attend to the duties of the morning.

8th That the Camp Shall be ready to Start each morning at 1/2 past seven o.Clock.

9th That implicit obediance to the officers be required of every man in the Camp.

10th That every man owning horses or Mules be required to bring them into the Camp at Sun down and make them fast.

11th That it shall be the duty of each teamster when the herd is brought in to see that his team is on hand or in the herd without fail.

12th That every member of the camp be at their quarters at nine oclock, and that the Guard cry the correct time each 1/2 hour without making any unnecessary noise. Captain Hyde made some remarks[.] Showed the great importance of vigilence on the part of the herds men And night guard. And set forth the caricetor [character] of the Indians, etc etc.

Captain Blodgett who is at the head of a Company of Emigrants bound for the gold mines in California and not a member of our Church But organized with us. Said He and his Company were willing to abide our Laws and regulations cheerfully. And be one with us. Said he Spoke the Sentiments of all his men And they were ready and willing for the performance of any duty

Morning of the 8th Camp ready to start by 8 Oclock but Still only under a partial organization. The divisions of ten not being fully organized nor could the[y] be untill the Camp Came up to the first division of fifty then at the Horn. Camp arrived at the Peapea [Pappea] about 4 Oclock PM and camped for the night.

Morning of the 9th Camp on the moove at 1/4 before 8 oclock. And arrived at the Horn at 1 P.M. in good health and Spirits[.] No accident, And found the first division of fifty on the West Shore waiting the arrival of the Second. The Camp immediately Commenced ferrying But were hindered same to make room for 5 or 6 hundred Pawnee Indians to cross over The crossed over 32 waggons and closed the Labors of the day.

Morning of the 10th (Sunday) Commenced ferrying and swimming the herd. About five PM all was over Safe. During the Previous night however. the herd became alarmed and being inclosed in a bend of the river by A String waggons. The[y] crowded so hard that a waggon wheel was smached, but no other damage done.

The full Organization being now accomplished And the divisions of ten arainged in their proper and respective order as follows[:]

CAPTAINS OF TENS --
1st Orson B[ennett]. Adams
2nd Daniel Collett
3rd Rosel Hyde
4th D[avid]. H. Redfield

A Serious occurance took place while ferrying the waggons which I have omitted to notice in the proper place. In running down one of the waggons onto the raft or ferry the raft give way and some of the Load had to be taken out. Captain Gully while assisting to unload a bail of cotton factory It fell upon him and he fell between the timbers of the raft and saved himself from a more serious injury. He was considerably hurt But was administered to immediately by Captains [Rosel] Hyde and Cahoon, and is fast recovering of the injury.

Orson B[ennett]. Adam's Division of Ten
John [William] Barry [Berry]: 1 Waggons, 1 Soul, 2 Oxen, 2 Cows, 1 L[oose]. Cattle, 1 Sheep, 1 Dog, 2 Doves
Daniel Allen: 1 Waggons, 7 Souls, 2 Oxen, 4 Cows, 1 L[oose]. Cattle, 1 Dog, 3 Doves
Samuel Gully: 5 Waggons, 8 Souls, 1 Mule, 22 Oxen, 9 Cows, 19 Sheep, 1 Dog
Hirum [Hyrum] Judd: 1 Waggons, 4 Souls, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows, 1 Pig, 2 ducks
G. [James] A. Livingston and [John Henry] Kincaid: 2 Waggons, 3 Souls, 2 horses, 4 Mules, 6 Oxen
Charles [Wakeman] Daulton [Dalton]: 2 Waggons, 4 Souls, 8 Oxen, 4 Cows
O[rson]. B[ennett]. Adams: 1 Waggons, 1 Soul, 4 Oxen
William Vandike [Van Dyke]: 1 Waggons, 1 Soul, 6 Oxen
Total: 14 Waggons, 35 Souls, 2 Horses, 5 Mules, 54 Oxen, 21 Cows, 2 L[oose]. Cattle, 20 Sheep, 1 Pig, 2 Ducks, 3 Dogs, 5 Doves

Daniel Colletts Division of Ten
Daniel Collett: 2 Waggons, 7 Souls, 8 Oxen, 3 Cows, 1 Cat
Edward Philips: 2 Waggons, 6 Souls, 8 Oxen, 4 Cows, 2 Pigs, 2 Doves
Wm. [William Joseph] Smith: 2 Waggons, 7 Souls, 12 Oxen, 5 Cows, 1 Pig, 5 Chickens
Thos. [Thomas] Atkins [Atkin]: 2 Waggons, 5 Souls, 10 Oxen, 5 Cows
Wm [William McMillen] Thompson: 1 Cow
John Colons [Coulam]: 2 Waggons, 7 Souls, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows
Lewis [Ogier] Hardy: 1 Waggons, 7 Souls, 3 Oxen, 3 Cows, 1 Cat, 1 Dog
James Mendanhall [Mendenhall]: 3 Waggons, 9 Souls, 12 Oxen, 5 Cows, 1 Pig, 7 Chickens, 1 Cat, 1 Dog
Wm. [William Knapp] Parshell [Parshall]: 1 Waggons, 1 Soul, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Total: 15 Waggons, 49 Souls, 63 Oxen, 28 Cows, 4 Pigs, 12 Chickens, 3 Cats, 2 Dogs, 2 Doves

Rosel Hydes Division of Ten
Rosel Hyde: 1 Waggons, 5 Souls, 4 Oxen, 4 Cows, 6 Chickens, 4 Cats, 1 Dog
Wm. [William] Hyde: 2 Waggons, 8 Souls, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows, 5 Chickens
Joseph [Walker] [blank space]: 2 Waggons, 8 Souls, 6 Oxen, 4 Cows
Elias [Hicks] Blackburn: 1 Waggons, 3 Souls, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows, 4 Chickens
Wm. [William] Lewis: 1 Waggon, 1 Soul, 4 Oxen
Enoch [Marvin] King: 2 Waggons, 5 Souls, 3 Oxen, 4 Cows, 1 Pig
Jenet Peters: 2 Waggons, 3 Souls, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows
E[phriam]. Tomkins[son]: 1 Waggon, 3 Souls, 7 Cows, 1 Cat
G.W. Robison: 1 Waggon, 2 Souls, 2 Oxen, 3 Cows
Andrew Shannon: 1 Soul, 1 Mule
Sarah Roggars [Rogers] & Amanda M. Roggars [Rogers]: 2 Waggons, 3 Souls, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows, 12 Sheep, 1 Pig, 2 Chickens, 1 Cat, 1 Dog
Eda [Hollister] Roggars [Rogers]: 1 Waggon, 7 Souls, 5 Oxen, 3 Cows, 7 Sheep, 1 Pig, 2 Chickens
Total: 16 Waggons, 49 Souls, 1 Mule, 46 Oxen, 33 Cows, 19 Sheep, 3 Pigs, 19 Chickens, 6 Cats, 2 Dogs

D.H. Redfields Davision of Ten
D[avid] H Redfield: 2 Waggons, 5 Souls, 8 Oxen, 3 Cows, 1 L[oose]. Cattle
H[enry Samuel] Alexander: 2 Waggons, 4 Souls, 6 Oxen, 2 Cows, 1 Cat, 1 Dog
T. [Zimri] H[artford]. Bakter [Baxter]: 2 Waggons, 3 Souls, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows, 1 L[oose]. Cattle, 1 Pig, 1 Cat
R[euben]. Miller: 2 Waggons, 9 Souls, 11 Oxen, 5 Cows, 2 Pigs, 1 Cat, 1 Dog
A[rza]. [Matson] Adams: 2 Waggons, 8 Souls, 10 Oxen, 8 Cows, 4 L[oose]. Cattle, 4 Sheep, 2 Pigs, 1 Chicken, 2 Ducks, 1 Cat, 1 Dog, 1 Bee[hive]
James A[gee] Smith: 1 Waggon, 3 Souls, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows, 2 Sheep, 2 Pigs, 1 Chicken
Wm. [William] W[illard] Smith: 2 Waggons; 6 Souls, 8 Oxen, 4 Cows, 4 Sheep, 1 Pig, 3 Chickens
Wm. [William] Young: 1 Waggon, 6 Souls, 4 Oxen, 1 Cow, 15 Sheep, 1 Pig, 3 Chickens, 1 Dog
Willis S[mith]. Young: 1 Waggon, 1 Soul, 4 Oxen, 2 Cows
Total: 15 Waggons, 45 Souls, 59 Oxen, 29 Cows, 6 L[oose]. Cattle, 25 Sheep, 9 Pigs, 8 Chickens, 2 Ducks, 4 Cats, 4 Dogs, 1 Bee[hive]

Morning of the 11th. Very rainy and disagreeable. Nothing wo[r]thy of not[e] occurred during the previous night among us. A man belonging to a Camp of 40 or 50 waggons on the East Side Bound for California, Died with c[h]olera in the evening. The camp Started in the after noon and Camped for the night at the first creek.

Morning of the 12th Camp under way at 1/2 past seven oclock. And arrived at the Platte river at 1/2 3 o'clock PM Camped for the night.

Morning of the 13th The Camp arose at the Sounding of the horn and found Some of the waggons Standing in the watter nearly to the axle trees. It having rained very hard during the night accompanied with very hard and repeated Shocks of thunder. The Camp on the moove at 11 oclock, A.M. The roads very muddy and bad. Camped at a small Lake or slough--distance about 4 1/2 miles.

Morning of the 14th The Camp Started this morning at 7 1/2 past seven oclock, and travelled about 13 miles and Camped at a point of timber on the banks of the Platte. During the after noon a child belonging to William Smith was injured by the team geting alarmed at a Yoke of bulls. And the wheels of the wagon pressing its head, but we trust not Serious. Also a child belonging to Brother [James] Mendanhall while in the act of jumping out of the wagon was cau[gh]t by the leg under one of the wheels and ingured [injured] Some, but nothing Serious.

Morning of the 15th Weather fine. Roads bad. The Camp started at 8½ O'Clock. And traviled to Shell Creek distance about 5 miles. The Bridge over the creek very bad and the creek high. It was with dificulty that teams could cross. We crossed over Slowly however and about 6 oclock P.M all were across safe. The camp Stoped for the night on the west Side, grass and water plenty.

Morning of the 16th This is a fine cool morning. Wind South East. Camp under full motion at 8 o'clock, and arrived at L. Lake at 3 1/4 oClock P.M[.] distance about 13 Miles. Having Crossed Some very bad Sloughs.

Sunday Morning of the 17th This is another fine cool morning. Wind South; threatins rain. Camp ready to Start at 7 1/2 o'clock, And arrived at the Loup fork and timber at 1 O Clock P.M Here we found Plenty of Water, wood, And grass, and Laid Still the remainder of the Sabbath. We had a shower of rain about the time we arrived here.

Monday morning the 18th Camp under full motion at 8 O Clock. The weather fine and cool. A general time of health prevails. Traviled about 12 Miles and Camped for the night near Long Lake. w[h]ere we arrived about 3 1/2 O Clock P.M. Poor place to Camp. Water poor, grass also, Wood Scarce.

Tusday morning the 19th Camp Starts at 8 1/4 O Clock[.] weather fine[,] Wind west. Nothing new or Strange has transpired among us. Our teams so far stand the journey well. A dog belonging Azra Adams was shot by the guard last night. Camp arrived at Plumb [Plum] Creek at 5 O.Clock P.M having assisted to build A bridge across Beaver River which detained about 2 1/2 hours. Distance of travil this day about 12 1/2 miles.

Wednesday Morning the 20th Camp Starts this morning at 8 1/4 O Clock And arrived at the cedar River about 12 O Clock, which we found high and it was with Some dificulty that we Succeeded in fording[.] We all got over Safe however and Camped for the night on the west Side. In the Evening we had a tremendous rain the heavestest [heaviest] we have had since we Started. We arrived here got over about 3 O C P.M.

Thursday Morning the 21st Remained in Camp this day washing and fiting up.

Friday Morning 22nd Camp Starts at 8 1/4 O Clock and arrived at the crossing of the Loup fork about 6 O.Clock P.M. where we found the first camp of fifty. They having arrived the day previous and finding the river too high to ford they went into camp and waited our arrival. On the evening of their arrival[,] Brother [Nelson] McCarthy was taken with the c[h]olera and died about 3 OC At morning of the 21st And was buried on a butiful Mound w[h]ere Lay three others. One killed by the Indians, another died with the c[h]olera and the third was drownded.

Saturday Morning 23rd The river being too high to ford, the Camp Remains at this place. Washing[,] Black smithing and fiting up. The weather very warm and fine

Sunday Morning 24th Clear and warm. Both camps called togather at 11 O Clock A.M by the Sounding of the horn. For Public worship was opened by Singing a hymn, And prayer by Father Gidian [Gideon] Brownell, President O. Spencer arose and addressed the assembly at Some Length. In a very appropriate and instructive manner, And by asking the blessing of God upon the camps. Father G. Brownell rose and bore testimony to the truth and force of Prest Spencers remarks. And urged in the strongest manner a Speady reffermation in the treatment of our cattle--

Bro Wm. [William] Hyde rose and said he was happy to see both camps togather this Morning. And bore testimony to the truth of what had been said. And gives much aditional and usefull instructions

Bro Wm. Miller said. He felt that the remarks made were good, usefull, and for the benifit of this people. And he would now offer a prophecy if he could be sustained in it by this people. He Said if his company would unitedly obey the council of Presdint Spencer[,] captain [Samuel] Gully and himself as captain. Not another man should die with the Cholera in his camp. Amen

Benediction by Bror Wm. Hyde.

Monday Morning 25th This Morning threatens rain. Wind East, quite cool. The rive[r] fell a few inches during the previous night. But it is yet too high to ford with safety. The camps remain the same as yesterday[.] The day has been Spent Looking out a ford But none found that the camps can cross in safety.

Tuesday Morning 26th Calm and pleasant. Some cloudy. about 1 1/2 O'Clock The two camps commenced fording, and at 7 O.Clock in the Evening all were Over Safe. No accident, no damage done to goods, or property. Some cases of Cholera have appeared in the first Camp of fifty and bore a dangerous aspect.

Wednesday Morning 27 Camps Start at 10 1/2 O.Clock A.M and traviled till 6 O.C P.M and camped for the night on the prairia [prairie] among the Sand hills. two antilope were killed to day which is the first game that has been killed since we left, worthy of note. distance of travil about 13 miles[.] no watter.

Thursday Morning 28th Camp starts And under full way at 5 O Clock And arrived at Prairia [Prairie] Creek at 10 1/2 O clock A.M. Crossed over and camped for the night. Distance from the Loup Fork 22 3/4 miles. Ambors Kelly [Ambrose Kellogg] of the first camp who had been previously taken with the Chalora [cholera] died at this place at 35 minutes past 11 O clock P.M And was intered on the bank of the Creek close to the road.

Friday Morning 29th At 7 1/2 O C, on the way, and arrived at wood River at 3 1/2 O.C. P.M Distance about 12 Miles. Here all hands commenced burning coal to Carry with us. (A shower of rain)

Saturday Morning 30th The camp remained at this place Burning Coal. Capts Gully and Hyde while hunting for deer and Elk on grand Island found a Stray Ox, which they brought into camp. Weather fine.

Sunday Morning July 1st 1849 Camp Starts at 8 1/2 O.C. And arrived at the main Platte timber about 4 O.C. P.M. Distance about 14 miles. Moses Haile a member of the first fifty But not a member of the Church, And [incomplete entry]

Wednesday Morning 4th Camp remains at this place it is Suposed to be about five miles below fort Childs on the Platt[e] bottom.

This Morning Henry Vanderhoof of the first camp, a Calafaunia [California] emigrant from Michigan, Was taken with the Cholara and died about 1/2 past 2 O.C. P.M.

Meeting at 4 1/2 OC

Thursday Morning 5th Captain S[amuel]. Gully was taken yesterday about noon with the Cholara (a very vilent [violent] attact) And he died this morning about 5 O.C, Camp Still remains at this place. Weather fair Wind South.

Friday Morning 6th Camp on the moove at 7 O.C. And traviled till 4 O.C. P.m and camped on a Low bench of Lond [land] about 1 1/2 miles East of deep Dry creek, and 210 1/2 miles from winter quarters. Roads good. weather fair.

Saturday Morning 7th Threatens rain, having rained during the which makes the roads heavy this morning. Camp Starts at 8 1/2 O.C. And traviled till 4 O.C. P.m. And camped for the night on Elm Creek. Good place to camp. Plenty grass, wood and watter[.] distance from Winter Quarters 221 miles. Weather cool.

Sunday Morning 8th Camp remains at this place to spend the Sabbath. Meeting at 11 O.C And opened by prayer by President Spencer. A Instructive discourse on the first principles of the Gospel by Captain Hyde Followed by apropriate remarks by Captain Miller and President Spencer. Benediction by counciler [William Farrington or Daniel Stiles] Cahoon. Weather clear and warm wind Southwest

Monday Morning 9th Camp Starts at 7 O.C and traviled till 6 O.C. P.M and camped for the night on the Platt[e] River (w[h]ere the road joins the river) distance from Winter Quarters 239 1/4 miles. Weather very warm. The warmest of the present season up to this date. Mercury 96. (except yesterday, it was 100.)

Tusday morning 10th Camp on the moove at ten O.C and traviled till five O.C P.M and camped for the night about two miles east of Willow Lake on the Platt[e] river, about 249 1/2 miles from W[inter]. Quarters.

Wednesday Morning the 11 camp Starts at 7 O.C and traviled till 6 O.C - P.M. and camped for the night near the Platt[e], about 5 miles West of Deep Dry Creek. Weather cool Wind S West. This day the first Buffilo were discovered. One killed[.] Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 266 3/4 miles

Thursday morning 12th Camp mooves at 7 O.C and traviled till about 2 O.C P.M and camped for the night on the Banks of the Platt[e] w[h]ere the road joins the river near the Sandy Bluffs. Latitude 41 degrees 0' 47". distance from W[inter]. Quarters 278 3/4 Miles. It commenced raining about the time the camp arrived at this place and it rained hard most of the afternoon. Two buffilo were killed to day and brought into camp

Friday Morning 13th Camp remains at this place Hunting[,] washing and fiting up &c Five buffilo were killed to day four of which were brought into camp. Weather fine.

Saturday Morning 14th Camp Starts at 8 O.C and traviled till 5 O.C P.M. and camped for the night at the Cold Springs at the foot of the bluffs, at the head of the Pawnee Swamps[.] distance from W[inter] Quarters 293 miles. Weather good Roads bad

Sunday Morning the 15th Camp remains at this place to spend the Sabbath. Meeting of both camps at 12 O.C. The Subject and propriety of apointing a captain of 100, to fill the place of Samuel Gully, dicieced [deceased], was discussed by the Meeting. And President O. Spencer was apointed to act as Captain of 100 or both fifties. Weather fair. and warm. One buffilo killed.

Monday Morning 16th Camp Starts at 8 O.C k and traviled till 6 1/2 O.C. - P.M and camped for the night at deep wide Creek 308 1/2 miles from Winter Quarters. Roads very bad and Weather very warm. Mercury 92digrees. In the evening it commenced raining and rained very hard during the night. One Buffilo killed But not brought into camp.

Tuesday Morning 17th Camp Started at 11 1/2 O.C and traviled till 6 O. P and camped for the night w[h]ere R and R roads join the river[.] Distance from W[inter] Quarters 313 3/4 miles. Roads very bad, and allmost Impasable. By doubling and thribling [tripling] teames we Succeeded in reaching this point. Weather good

Wednesday Morning 18 About Sunrise this morning a Buffilo was discovered close to camp and with the herd, which was killed and dressed. Camp Starts at 8 O.C and traviled unto 6 1/4 O.C and camped for the night at 2nd Sandy Bluffs, East foot. Distance from Winter Quarters 330 3/4 m[.] Roads in places good. Weather fine[.] Large herds of Buffilo in sight nearly all day. One Buffalo cow killed to day

Thursday Morning 19th Camp Starts at 8 1/2 O.C and traviled till 5 1/2 O.C - P.M and camped for the night at Shoal Stream 348 3/4 miles from W[inter]. Quarters. A fine cool day But few Buffilo seen to day

Friday Morning 20th Camp on the moove at 8 O.C and traviled till Crooked Creek[.] here Azra [Arza Matson] Adams in crossing over his team Broke a king Bolt which detained Captain [David H.] Readfield's [Redfield] ten the remainder of the day. and they camped here for the night. The remainder of the camp went on about three Miles and camped for the night near camp creek. A waggon Loaded with merchandise was over Set but no Serious damage done. Weather very cool, roads good, health good, Watter and grass exelant.

Saturday Morning July 21 The ten Left behind at Crooked Creek came up to the main camp about 8 1/2 O.C at which time all mooved off and traviled till about one Mile East of Watch Creek on the banks of the Platt[e]. Here captain Readfield's ten stoped and camped. The remainder of the camp Went on and camped for the night about one mile East of the Lone tree. 377 miles from W[inter]. Quarters. Roads good. Weather cool. some cloudy

Sunday Morning 22nd Captain Readfields ten Mooved up and joined the main camp about 12 O.C at their incampment. Remained here to Spend the Sabbath. Some time in the forenoon the first fifty passed our incampment. we having Left them on Tusday. They manifested some dissatisfaction on Account of it. Captain Hyde came back this morning to where captain Readfields ten were incamped And found Some fa[u]lt because they had not come up thought they could have done as well as not. But Manifested a calm and a mild Spirit. Captain Miller in Passing our camp told Some of the brethren that Captain Hyde had forfe[i]ted his word to him and he should have nothing more to do with him. Some Rain during the night[.] Roads not So good as yesterday. Weather warm. Wind South. Some Buffilo in this region. two killed But the Indians prevented our getting them.

Monday morning 23rd Camp Mooves off this morning at 7 1/2 O.C and traviled till 5 O.C - P.M and camped for the night Midway between the two dry creeks[.] Weather cool. Roads fine and dry. Good health in the camp. No Buffilo in this rigion.

Tusday morning 24th Camp Starts at 7 O.C and traviled uninterrupted till 5 O.C P.M and camped for the night a[t] the Small Lake South Side of the road[.] 410 1/2 miles from W[inter]. Quarters. Roads good. Weather very warm. Temperature 94 Digrees.

Wednesday Morning 25 Camp Starts at 7 1/2 O.C and traveled till 5 1/4 O.C P.M and camped for the night w[h]ere R And R the road joins the river. Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 426 Miles. Roads Dry, But Sandy[.] Weather quite cool. Wind North

Thursday Morning 26th Commenced raining this morning about 5 1/2 O.C and continued till about 9 O.C--At the Sounding of the horn the herd was brought in. And at 12 O.C the camp Started and traviled till 6 O.C & P.M and camped for the night[.] At west foot of Low Sandy Bluffs Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 4 Miles. Roads mudy. Weather quite cool. Wind North. On our way this afternoon a Buffilo was killed close to our waggons. And Dressed and taken into camp. First fifty still in advance.--

Friday morning 27th Camp Starts at 8 oO.C and traviled till 6 1/4 O.C P.M and camped for the night about five miles west of Chimney Rock on the banks of the Platt[e], having turned off from the road about 1 1/2 Miles. Weather warm. roads bad in places.

Saturday Morning 28th Camp remains at this place to day. Captain Hyde being quite Sick, And the Sisters wishing to wash, And Some Smithing to be done[.] The Cattle also nead rest. The day is very warm. This is an old camping place of the Natives and is a b[ea]utiful place. Health of camp generally good. Grass plenty.

Sunday morning 29th While in Camp at this place the River being Examined and a Suitable place found to ford[.] The Camp commenced fording about 7 1/2 O.C. And by 3 O.C P.M all were on the South Side Safe. with the Exception of the [illegible] of a reach or two and some other light injurys. Camp for the night at this place, it being about opposite our former incampment. The first fifty about 1 1/2 days in advance. Weather very cool. Wind high from the North.

Monday Morning 30th Camp Started at 7 O.C and traviled till 5 1/2 O.C--P.M and camped for the night in Scotts Bluffs. Distance of travil about 20 Miles[.] At this place we found from 500 to 1000 Indians 9Soug) [Sioux] with a great number of poneys. During the travil of to day some of the men in camp took up 21 head of Oxen and brought them on to this place. When we arrived here the[y] were all claimed by some French traders Located at this point And about to build a Large Trading Establishment[.] A heavey frost this morning

Tusday morning 31sts In turning out the herd Last Evening Some Mismanagement on the part of the herdsmen was a principle cause of about 40 head of our cattle straying off from the main herd and were not found untill 9 1/2 O.C this morning. About the Same time the troops from fort Laramie Arrived here to a[d]just or settle some Inguries [injuries] done to the w[h]ites by the Soug [Sioux] Indians, in the killing of a [w]hite man. The Indians alidge or justify themselves in some measure for the act because the w[h]ites brought the cholora [cholera]among them. They are Some hostile on this acount. It is suposed that about 600 have died with this decease [disease]. Camp Starts at 10 O.C and traviled till 5 1/2 O.C P.M and camped for the night on horse creek[.] Distance about 14 miles. Some frost Last night. Roads very good[.] Weather fine. health good.

Wednesday morning August 1st The Laramie troops camped close by us Last night on their return to the fort. A fine morning with a Light frost. Camp Starts at 7 1/2 O.C and traviled till 4 1/2 O.C--P.M and camped for the night about 20 miles East of fort Laramie[.] Weather good. Health good. Roads good

Thursday Morning 2nd Camp Starts at 8 O.C and traviled till within five Miles of the Fort and camped for the night close [to] the Platt[e]. Captain Hyde and others went on to the fort. Brother Young had a Son born last night. Captain Hyde returned to camp in the Evening.

Friday morning 3rd Camp Starts at 8 O.C and traviled till about 3 O.C P.M. and Camped for the night about 5 Miles West of fort Laramie. having Passed the fort about 12 1/2 O.C[.] At this place of Incamp[m]ent we cau[gh]t up with the first camp of fifty. the[y] were camped to remain till monday, to smith and recruit. A short time of dancing in the evening

Saturday Morning 4th Camp remains at this place. A Short time of danceing in the evening.

Sunday Morning 5th Camp Still remains at this place. Meeting at 2 O.C P.M President [Orson] Spencer addressed the assembly at Some Length. and with great clearness. A number of Persons from the fort were in attindance. Bro Hyde added some apropriate remarks. Camp starts about 10 O.C and traviled 'till

Monday Morning 6th Camp starts about 10 O.C and and traviled about 8 miles and camped for the night near the Platt[e] River. Weather warm and dry. Grass very poor.

Tusday Morning 7th Camp on the moove at 8 O.C and traviled till 9 O.C P.M and camped for the night on the Platte river on the P Bottom[.] Distance of travel about 20 miles. Both fifties (Save one Ten) camped at this place. Camps [have] some trouble to Seperate the herds as the first fifty intended to remain here for day to wait the arrival of the other ten.

Wednesday Morning 8th Camp Starts at 11 O.C and traviled about 5 Miles and camped for the night at a creek Plenty of grass, wood, and watter. As soon as we arrived here we commenced setting tyre and doing other Smithing[.] An ox was lost here having Strayed from the herd.

Thursday Morning 9th Camp Starts-or two tens, about 9 1/2 O.C And the other two tens about 11 1/2 O.C and travelled till 5 O.C P.M and camped for the night on the Platte Bottom close [to]the river. Here we had to repair a pair of hounds. Weather cool roads good. A Sick Ox was left here

Friday Morning 10th Camp Starts at 8 1/2 O.C and traviled till 6 O.C P.M and camped for the night on La Bonte River 582 3/4 miles from Winter Quarters. At this place we overtook the 2 tens which Left us at horse creek.

Saturday Morning 11th Camp Starts at 8 1/2 O.C and traviled till 6 O.C--P.M and camped for the night on A La Prele River[.] distance from W[inter]. Quarters 602[.] About two Miles before we arrived at this place we Met Bro A[lmon]. W[hiting]. Babbett [Babbitt] and three others With the Mail from the Vally, who give us cheering news from that Quarter. Feed for cattle very scarce. Weather fine Roads Dry and broken. Good health in the camp. Bro [Zimri Hartford] Baxter Stopped back 2 miles on account of the health of his wife [Eunice Abigale Seavy Baxter]. She not being able to travel any farther

Sunday Morning 12th Camp Starts at 11 O.C and traviled to the Fourche Boise River[.] Distance from Winter Quarte[r]s 610 3/4 Miles. A heavy shower of rian [rain] accompanied by a Severe wind passed on the north tuching us Litely. The Platt[e] on the rise by its effect. Weather cool. Roads rough

Monday Morning 13th Camp Starts at 8 1/2 O.C and camped for the night about 6 O.C P.M on the Banks of the Platte Near the Sudden bend in the road. (1 Mile East) Cattle much fatigued and worn out on account of feed. One ten back about one Mile.

Tusday th Camp Starts at 8 1/4 O.C and traviled in three divisions Captains [Rosel] Hyde and [Orson Bennett] Adams with their respective tens in the advance. They camped about 5 miles East of the upper Ford on the Platt[e]. Finding plenty of feed[.] Captain [David H.] Redfield, with his ten Camped [illegible] miles east of Mud[d]y Creek in a bend of the Platt[e]. good grass and Plenty. Captain [Daniel] Collett still in the rear.

Wednesday Morning 15th Captain Readfield [Redfield] with his ten Started at 7 O.C and traviled till 2 O.C P.M And found the two tens in advance Camped 3 Miles East of the Upper Platt[e] ford in a bend of the river. Good grass and plenty. Captain Collett Still in the rear. Weather Cool with high winds.

Thursday Morning 16th Camp remains at this place recroating, smithing &c Captain Collett still in the rear.

Friday Morning 17th Camp remained at this place[.] Captain Collett arrived about 1 O.C P.M all well. having stoped to recrute, having found feed

Saturday Morning 18th Camp Leaves this place at 11 O.C and camped for the night about 2 miles west of the upper ford of the Platt[e] on the banks of the Same--The first fifty arrived at our former place of incampment. One Buffilo killed, wind high, weather cool.

Sunday Morning 19th The herd was brought in at an early hour preparatory for a start. But Soon finding that 10 or 15 head were gone as well as a number of Mules[.] we were detained till 12 O.C at which time the camp Started having found the lost portion of the herd and Mules[.] Camped for the night at Mineral Spring[s] and Lake[.] Distance from W[inter] Quarters 661 miles

Monday Morning the 20th Camp Starts at 7 1/2 O.C and traviled till 6 O.C--P.M and camped for the night at Bad Slough 681 1/2 miles from W[inter]. Quar[ters.] Roads good. Weather warm in day time. but cool at night. The first fifty still in the rear Captain Collett with his ten 3 miles in the advance. all well. Good feeling and Spirit prevails in camp

Tusday Morning 21st Camp Starts on at 10 O.C being some detained on account of the Scattered condition of the herd[.] camped for the night at 6 O.C P.M. and the banks of the Sweet watter river, about two Miles East of Independence. Independence Rock is 698 3/4 miles from W[inter]. Quarters Rock. One waggon wheel broke. A bear, and A Buffalo killed. Roads very heavy Sand

Wednesday Morning 22nd Camp on the moove at 9 O.C and went as far as Devils Gate. Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 704 Camped for the night. Roads Sandy. Weather cool

Thursday Morning 23rd Camp remains at this place. smithing, and to wait the arrival of the first fifty still in the rear.

Friday Morning 24th Camp starts at 12 O.C. About the same time Bro Hyde received few lines from Bro Spencer requesting him to tarry until the first fifty came up. Camped mooved up the river about 2 1/2 miles And camped.

Saturday Morning 25th Camp remains at the place waiting the arrival of the first fifty 2 1/2 Miles East. Weather fine Grass good. no deaths among the cattle yet[.] The first fifty came up about 12 O.C and camped close by us. A general time of health prevails in both camps. Some of the teams much fatigued.

Sunday Morning 26th Captains Readfield [Redfield] and Collett with their tens Started about 10 O.C[.] The first fifty in the advance And traviled the North road Leading up the river And camped for the night about three miles East of high gravelly Bluffs. Capt [Rosel] Hyde with the other two tens remained at their place of incampment on account of sickness

Wednesday Morning 29th This is a cold and stormy Morning having Rained and Snowed most of the night. Snows fast this morning. The tops of the mountains on the right and Left capped with snow. The earth covered. On account of the scattered condition of the herd the camp did not Start till 1 O.C P.M. It having cleared off and is a fine warm afternoon about 7 miles from our place of incampment. A child [James Marion Young] about 3 years old belonging to Bro [William] Young While in the act of taking it out of the waggon, was let fall and both wagon wheels passed over its boddy [body]. It died in about eight hours. Camp arrived at the ford of the Sweet watter No 5 before ten O.C P.M The first in the rear. Captain Hyde and the other two tens also

Thursday Morning 30th Camp Started at 1/2 past 12 O.C P.M and traveled till 1/4 before six O.C P.M and camped for the night on the S[weet] Watter Bottom w[h]ere the road Leaves the river[.] Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 769 1/2 Miles. The child which was killed was buiried at this place. Captain Hyde Still in the rear. Weather fine, some cool, Roads not so good as yesterday. as very heavy frost this morning[.] One Stray ox found to day. A general time of health in the camp.

Friday Morning 31st Camp Starts about 9 O.C and traviled till the branch of the Sweet Water[.] Distance from W[inter] Quarters, 782 3/4 miles. At this place Capt [Orson Bennett] Adams ten overtook us. Capt [Rosel] Hyde and the first fifty about 8 miles in the rear.

Saturday Morning 1st of Sept: Camp Starts at 10 O.C and camped for night at the Last crossing of the S[weet]. Water Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 789 3/4 miles. Wind high. Weather cold

Sunday Morning 2nd About 10 O.C Captain Hyde came up with the other ten which we left on the S[weet]. Water near Devils gate. and about 1 O.C the whole camp started and camped for the night on the S[weet]. Water at the twin Mountains[.] Distance from W[inter]. Qua[rters] 796 3/4 miles[.] Captain camp lost two head of Oxen while in camp at devil's gate.

Monday Morning 3rd Camp starts at 9 O.C and camped for the night about 2 miles West of the crossing of the pacific creek. At this crossing a waggon was over set. At this place of incampment we found plenty of Alkali And it was considered dangerous to Stop Long. two head of Oxen died at this place in a few hours after our arrival[.] A portion of the first fifty in camp

Tuesday Morning 4th Camp starts at a very early hour on acount of the Alkali and the great distance of travel to reach a place of incampment[.] At 1/2 past 3 O.C A.M. and camped for the [night] at Little Sandy[.] Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 826 3/4 miles. A portion of the first fifty in camp close by. Camp reached this place at 2 O.C P.M.--

Wednesday Morning 5th Camp mooved on and camped for the night on Big Sandy. Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 835 miles[.] Roads good. Weather fine grass Poor. good health in camp.

Thursday Morning 6th In collecting the herd this morning one ox was found dead another missing which detained Capt Readfield's [Redfields] Ten some time[.] The main camp started at 1/4 before 10 O.C and camped for the night on Big Sandy[.] Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 852 miles.

Friday Morning 7th Camp Mooved on as far as Green River[.] One ox died during the day. Camped for the night on the West side.

Saturday Morning 8th Camp remains at this place about 12 O.C[.] A train of wagons and oxen from the Valley met our camp to assist the immigration, bringing good news from the vally. The[y] camped for the night near by. The first fifty, or a portion of it came up about the Same time, And camped for the night about three miles down the river. One ox died during last night.

Sunday Morning 9th Some of our camp leave to go ahead to the vally. Camp Starts at 12 O.C and camped for the night on Green River w[h]ere the road le[a]ves the River[.] Distance from Winter Quarters 867 miles. The first fifty about three miles in the rear.

Monday morning 10th Camp Starts at 1/4 past 10 O.C and camped for the night on Blacks Fork[.] Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 882 1/2 miles. Weather fine. A good place to fish. one ox was left this morning to die And a heifer died on the way.

Tuesday morning 11th Camp starts at 1/2 past 11 O.C, and camped for the night near Small creek on Blacks Fork. Distance from W[inter]. Quar[ters] 898 miles. Roads very good[.] one ox left to die this morning[.] Weather fine.

Wednesday Morning 12th Camp Starts at 1/2 past 9 O.C and camped for the night on Blacks Fork (Stream) at a bend. Distance from W[inter]. Quarters 909 1/4 m[iles]. Weather fine. Good health in camp. The first Fifty in the rear.

Thursday Morning 13th Camp Starts at Ten O.C, and traveled till 1/2 past 2 O.C P.M. and camped for the night at Fort Bridger. Roads good. The first fifty came up and camped near by us. One ox Left not being able to travil. Distance from Winter Quarters

Friday Morning 14th Camp assembled the herd to Start. And found one ox dead. and Some others missing, which detained Captain Readfields [Redfield's] Ten So that they did not Start, But remained in camp near the fort. The remainder of the camp in company with captain [Rosel] Hyde went on, the first fifty in advance. Our camp having found near the Last crossing of the Platt[e] 15 head of Oxen some of which were marked U.S. At this place of incampment the[y] were demanded by some of the officers of the Government train and given up. The information that our camp had their cattle was given these men by a member of our camp. Enoch [Marvin] King.

Saturday Morning 15th Captain Readfields [Redfield's] ten Started at 1/2 past 10 O.C and camped for the night on a Small creek about 2 miles east of Mud[d]y fork. at this place the remainder of our camp camped for the night, the night previous.

Sunday Morning 16th our Little camp consisting of Readfields [Redfield's] ten Started at 1/4 passed 10 O.C and camped for the night on the top of the summit about 7 miles East of Bear River. Some of the first fifty in camp when our camp came up. Bro Caminel and three others with the mail camped with us. We had a meeting in the evening[.] Captain Hyde still in the advance with the remainder of our Camp. Roads fine.

Monday Morning 27 [17]th Our camp Started at 1/2 past 9 O.C and camped for the night on Bear River 950 1/4 miles from W[inter]. Quarters. One ox left to day, haven given out. Capt Hyde still in advance

Tuesday Morning 18th Camp Started this morning at 10 O.C and camped for the night at Cold Springs on the right of the road 967 miles from W[inter]. Quarters. Weather fine[.] good health in camp. Capt Hyde Still in advance.

Wednesday Morning 19th Camp Started at 1/2 past 9 O.C and camped for the night on Elko Creek about 12 miles down. Roads bad. Weather fine, cold nights, hard frost. Capt Hyde Still in the advance.

Thursday Morning 20th Camp Started at 1/2 past 9 O.C and camped for the night on Small Creek where the bridge has been[.] 994 1/4 m[iles] from W[inter] Quarters.

Friday Morning 21st Camp started at 10 O.C and camped for the night on Kanyon [Canyon] Creek about 1/2 the way up. Grass Poor. Captain and the Three tens Still ahead.

Saturday Morning 22nd Camp Started 1/2 past 11 O.C being detained Looking for a Stray ox, But did not Succeed in finding him. One ten of the first fifty camped 1/2 mile in the rear. A Second ox Strayed by the way coming through the Kanyon [canyon] in the thick Brush, and was Left[.] camped for the night 1/2 way up the mountains.

Sunday Morning 23rd Camp Started about 10 O.C. being detained repairing a waggon, And camped for the night near w[h]ere the road Leaves Browns Creek in Lost Kanyon [Canyon].

Monday Morning the 24th Camp Started at Ten O.C and traveled down the Kanyon, and camped for the night in the vally of the great Salt Lake near the mouth of the Kanyon. All the other portion of the camp arrived in the vally the day previous[.] Our Little camp consisting of 5 waggons Started about 9 and arrived at the City about 1/2 past 11 Ocloc half past Eleven o'clock, SEPTEMBER 24th, 1849.

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