Transcript

Transcript for "Salt Lake Sensation," Ogden Standard Examiner, 16 Nov. 1891, 1

Martin D. Wendell, who was very deaf, testified--I joined the Mormons in 1847, came to Utah in 1862 . . . .

I saw the death penalty inflicted on a man named Green, in 1862, about twenty miles west of Green River, W. H. Dame was captain of the train. . . .

Billy Williams, now dead, and Mark Surridge were there. Joseph Follett, of Cottonwood, saw the trouble, so did Dave McBride, of Iron county, and Blackburn, John W. Young, of Iron county, George Snyder, now dead, and others; my son George was there; he now lives at Peoa, Summit county; Green, the man killed, had two wagons, with three yoke of cattle to each; a Gentile was with Green; the latter was killed about 9 in the evening; when we got to the place Captain Dame led me outside of the train, I saw eleven men, in buckskin clothes, whom he called mountaineers, and told me to warn the people not to go outside of camp, at night Green was called by three men; he would not come, and they dragged him out; one caught him by the hair and another cut his throat; they got $5000 from him; some of us began to object, and John W. Young said if we did not shut up, we would be served the same; next day Dame said Green had apostatized once, and now he had apostatized and gone to hell; my son and the Gentile took Green's outfit to the Tithing yard. It was John W. Young, of Iron county, cousin to John W. Young, of this city. It was not Joseph W. Young, the emigration agent. . . .

The three men who took Green out of the wagon were seen by the others I have mentioned; one of the three was Bill Hickman, John W. Young was not there; there were more than ten of us present when the three men took him, and we did not try to save him. Green had a wife and two or three children. He lived near Farmington; he told me he had $5,000; I saw the men take the money; I made no protest; we had no idea that the men were Danites, but they were. Bill Hickman was the captain; he afterwards told me he was there. I left the Church about five years after the killing[.] I don't know whether or not Green had had his endowments; he told me men were spying about him, and he was timid about getting to Salt Lake . . . . The three men took Green's body away with them. There was another man present. Several persons protested against the murder. These were Billy Williams, Follett, Serridge, Sanders and myself. Surridge afterwards apostatized. Joseph Follett is now living near the mouth of Cottonwood.

;