Transcript

Transcript for Martin Zyderlaan camp journal, 4 September 1863, 1-12.

Following is a copy of the camp journal (with a few alterations) kept by Martin Zyderlaan, clerk of the Patterson Company:

Sunday, June 28 (1863). The company was organized with the following officers: Alvus Hueston Patterson, of Payson, Utah, captain; John Stock of G.S.L. City, chaplain; Warren Hancock of Payson, Utah, sergeant of the Guard, and Martin Zuderlaan [Zyderlaan] of G.S.L. City, clerk.

Monday, June 29. We started from Florence with 33 teams, traveled at Little Papilion; good feed, little wood, weather fair.

Tuesday, June 30. We had a severe thunder storm accompanied by much rain in the morning. Started in the afternoon, traveled 8 miles and camped at Ranche No. 1; good feed, no wood, weather damp.

Wednesday, July 1. Started, traveled 8 miles and camped half a mile beyond Elkhorn Bridge; good camping place.

Thursday, July 2. Traveled 14 miles and camped one mile beyond Fremont, along Platte River; a good camping place, weather warm; 17 more teams had joined us, which makes the total number 50. At this place I made out the required list which was sent out by mail to Pres. Feramorz Little to be sent to Pres. Brigham Young to be published in the "Deseret News," which was a follows: 50 teams as before mentioned and the officers; then the rest of the people belonging to the company which are as follows:
Joseph Zundell from Payson, Utah
F. M. Keel, from Payson, Utah
Wm. [William] Cloward, from Payson Utah
Ann Fotheringham and two children
David M. Taylor and two children
Margaret [Kirkman] Green and five children
James [Kirkham] Green, Emelia [Jane Stewart Legg] (his wife) and one child
Richard Legg
Ann [Toan] Swift and 8 children
Elizabeth [Curtis] Short and 4 children
David [Alexander] Mitchell [II], Christiana [Clignet] (his wife), and 3 children [blank space] from the Eastern Province, Cape of Good Hope, South Africa.
Amasa Scovill, Sarah (his wife)
Leroy Scovill, Adeline (his wife) and 4 children from Washtenaw, Mich.
James [Kirkham] Grey, Sarah (his wife) and 2 children from Canada West, British America
John Woodhead, from Canada West, Brit. Am
Alfred Bennett, Lucy (his wife) and 2 children
Wm. Phipps, Lydia Ann (his wife) and 1 child.
Jefferson Copeland, Louisa (his wife) and 2 children
Elias Copeland
James Tidd
Andrew J. Hall, Nancy (his wife) and 5 children
Albert Brown, Sarah (his wife) and 6 children
Jane Howell, James (her son) and Rosina (his wife) and 3 children
J. W. Mikesell, Ruth (his wife) and 6 children
John Mikesell, Sarah (his wife) and 1 child from Pottawattamie County, Iowa.
Joseph Taylor, Elizabeth (his wife) and 3 children from Johnson County, Iowa
Henry Greyham from Johnson County, Iowa
Wm. Oglesby, from Cook Co., Illionis [Illinois]
Wm. Brown, Mary (his wife) and 7 children
Charles Morgan, Ann (his wife) and 1 child from St. Louis, Mo.
John Burrows from Nottinghamshire, England.
Esther Delhay from St. Louis, Mo.
John R. King, Hannah (his wife) and 5 children from Portage Co., Ohio.
Azzirah Moss, from Pottawattamie, Co., Iowa.
John Williams, Arminta (his wife) and 1 child from Calhoun Co., Ill.
Adam Lightner, Mary E. (his wife) and 5 children from Dakota Co. Minn.
Edwin Bingham from Minersville, Bingham Co., Utah
Eliza Gilbert from Dakota Co., Minn.
Catherine Roberts from Calhoun Co., Ill.
Benjamin R. Houlse from Pinto Creek, Iron Co., Utah.
James Low, from Beaver Co, Utah.
Alexander Miller from American Fork, Utah
George Cunningham, from American Fork, Utah
Joseph Wrighley, from American Fork, Utah
James Brooks, Matilda (his wife) and 6 children from Story Co., Iowa.
Delorama Parish, Eletha J. (his wife) and one child from Pottawattamie Co., Iowa.
Wm. Barnett, from Pottawattamie Co., Iowa.
Rosinda Landon, Pottawattamie Co., Iowa.
Alfred Beebe from Farmington, Utah
Charlotte Evans, from Shropshire, England
A C. Dufrander, from Sweden
A Engström, from Sweden
A Lindberg, Bengta (his wife) and 2 children from Sweden.
A Tranström, (his wife)
A Bergren, Hannah (his wife) and 2 children from Sweden.
N Nilssen, Karina (his wife and 4 children from Sweden.
P Nilsson, Bengta (his wife and 4 children from Sweden
P Larsson, Luilja (his wife and 4 children from Sweden
George Frandsen, from Mount Pleasant, Utah.
A Hansen, from G.S.L City, Utah

Friday, July 3. We traveled 12 miles and camped for noon on the north bend of Platte River; started again and traveled 6 miles and camped on the Platte; good feed, little wood, weather fair.

Saturday, July 4. We started at 7 o'clock a.m., traveled 10 miles, stopped for noon; good feed, but no water for the cattle. Started again, traveled 8 miles and camped on Balding's Ranche, alongside the Platte River; a good camping place, weather fair.

Sunday, July 5. Traveled 9 miles, then crossed the Loup Fork with the ferry boat; paid 55 cents per wagon; camped for the night on the other side of the stream; good feed, weather fair.

Monday, July 6. Traveled 10 miles and stopped for noon on the Platte River; good feed. Starting again we traveled 7 miles and camped on the Platte again; a good camping place, weather warm.

Tuesday, July 7. Traveled 9 miles and stopped for noon at the Platte River again. After starting again we traveled 4 miles and camped on the Platte, good feed, weather very warm during the day.

Wednesday, July 8. We traveled 12 miles and nooned on the Platte River; good feed. Starting again we traveled 7 miles and camped along side of the Platte; good feed, weather fair.

Thursday, July 9. Traveled 10 miles and stopped for noon on the Shoemakers Ranche. Started again and traveled 4 miles and camped on the Platte River; good camping place. Weather very warm during the day.

Friday, July 10. Traveled 8 miles, stopped for noon on a fork of the Platte River; good feed. Started again and traveled 8 miles and camped on Wood River; good camping place, weather fair.

Saturday, July 11. Traveled 16 miles and camped for the night at Wood River Center. Grass rather short. Weather pleasant.

Sunday, July 12. Traveled 7 miles, nooned at Nebraska Center. Starting again we traveled 13 miles and camped on the Platte; good feed, little wood, weather fair.

Monday, July 13. Before starting every accountable person was called by the captain to assemble at the center of the corral, which call was obeyed. The business of this meeting was to get up a collection to get the captain a horse, for the use of the company. This matter was put to vote by the chaplain and was carried unanimously. I was appointed the collector. Following is a list of the donors:

Janet Brooks, $2.00. John R. King, $1.25. James Howell, 50 cents. Leroy Scovill, $2.00. R A. [Richard Alexander] Beard, $1.00. C [Charles Rogers] Morgan, $1.00. $10.00. A [Alexander] Miller, $1.00. Wm. Phipps, $2.00. L Beisset [Loren Elias Bassett], $1.00. J [Jefferson] Copland, $2.00. James Grey, $3.00. Elizabeth Grey, $1.00. Harriette Grey, $1.00. [Andrew] J Hall, $6.00. Ann Fotheringham, $7.00. Wm. Oglesby, $0.65. D. [Delorma] Parish, $0.50. Wm. Brown, $6.00. Geo. [William] Green, $0.50. Margaret [Kirkman] Green, $1.00. Ann [Toan] Swift, $0.75. H [Henry] Greyham, $0.25. James [Kirkham] Green, $1.00. P [Pehr] Nilsson, $1.00. N [Nils] Nilsson, $1.60. P [Pehr] Larsson, $0.50. P Lindbert [Lindberg], $2.50. Wm. [D.] Johnson, $5.00. J Chambdrlain [James Chamberlain], $0.70. H [Henry] Chamberlain, $0.55. A [Anders Nilsson] Transtrm, $2.00. G H Williams, $0.50. Elizabeth Gilbert, $1.00. A. [Anders] Bergren, $0.20, Total amt. $69.95 Edwin Bingham, $3.50. Total amt. $73.45.

After the meeting we started, traveled 10 miles and camped at a slough; good feed, wood and water. Started again, traveled 8 miles and camped for the night at Elm Creek; good feed, wood plentiful, weather fair.

Twelve more teams have joined the company since we left Fremont. The individuals belonging to these wagons are as follows: R. A. [Richard Alexander] Beard, from Salt Lake City, Utah, Mathilda [Rutledge Beard], his mother and two more of her sons, from Doniphan Co., Kansas. Frederick Rich from G.S.L. City, Utah. Margaret Rich, his wife, and eight children and John Knoble, his father-in-law, from Lafayette County, Wisconsin. Loren [Elias] Bassett, Huldah [Dimrus Vaughn Bassett] (his wife) and three children: Harmon, his son, Margaret, his wife, and two children, [blank space] from Mills County, Iowa. James and Henry Chamberlain from Centerville, Davis County, Utah. William D. Johnson, Sen., and William D. Johnson, his son. William [Waldemar] Selck, from Copenhagen, Denmark. John Bottomly from Lafayette County, Wisconsin.

Tuesday, July 14. We took Elder Joseph W. Young's cut-off, traveled 16 miles and camped for the night on the Platte; good feed, weather cool and pleasant.

Wednesday, July 15. We traveled 12 miles, nooned alongside of the Platte. Starting again, we traveled 7 miles and camped for the night on the Platte; good feed and wood, weather cold and cloudy.

Thursday, July 16. Traveled 12 miles and nooned on the Platte River. Starting again we traveled 8 miles and camped for the night good feed, weather cloudy.

Friday, July 17. Traveled 8 miles and camped on Skunk Creek, where we stayed overnight on account of having to make a new axletree for Brother [James] Brook's wagon, which had broken down. This work was done by Brother [Frederick] Rich, the wagon-maker of the company. His calling as a wagon-maker exempted him from all camp duties, except meeting for prayer. The job being done in time caused us to start again; we traveled another 8 miles and camped at the Pawnee Springs; had a light thunder storm during the night.

Saturday, July 18. Traveled 10 miles and nooned on the other side of the North Bluff Fork of the Platte River. We started again, and traveled over the Bluffs 4 miles and camped for the night on the Platte again; good feed, weather fair. good feed but no wood; traveled 8 miles and camped for the night on the Platte; good feed , wood scarce, weather showery during night.

Sunday, July 19. Traveled 10 miles and nooned on the other side of the North Bluff Fork of the Platte. In the afternoon, traveled 4 miles over the bluff and camped on the Platte; good feed, weather fair.

Monday, July 20. Traveled 5 miles and nooned at Bluff Creek Branch; traveled over very heavy sandy roads in the forenoon. Bro. [William] Oglesby cached a marble bureau top, some fire-bricks for a cooking stove, some sofa and bed-springs, and a heavy black walnut box, in order to lighten his load, as his team was about to give out, being insufficient to draw the load. These articles were cached in the shape of a grave on the north side of the road; the head-board had the following inscription engraved with a knife: Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Brown, died July 20, 1863. Starting again we traveled 7 1/2 miles and camped on the Platte; good feed, had a light thunderstorm in the daytime.

Tuesday, July 21. Traveled 8 miles over considerable sandy road; nooned on the Platte; good feed. Starting again we traveled 10 miles and camped on the Platte; good feed, weather fair.

Wednesday, July 22. Traveled 10 miles; nooned at Camp Spring; good feed. Starting again we traveled 7 miles and camped for the night; good feed, weather fair.

Thursday, July 23. Traveled 5 miles; passed over the heaviest sandy ridge. Emelia, daughter of David and Christiana Mitchell, one year, two months and 11 days old, died of inflammation of the bowels at 9:30 o'clock a.m. This babe was buried five miles from our last camping place, and about 7 miles below Ash Hollow, on the north side of the Platte River, close to the two forks of the road, one road leading to the river, and the other along the foot of the bluff to avoid the slough. We camped at this place over night on account of a thunderstorm; good feed.

Friday, July 24. Traveled 9 miles and camped for noon at Castle or Quicksand Creek. At this place were some of the Valley teamsters stationed, taking care of cattle, flour, etc., for some of the different companies which started for Utah last spring, excepting capt Captain Murdock's Company, which is about 30 miles ahead of us on their return to Utah. We started again and traveled 6 miles and camped for the night on the Platte. It being the 24th of July, a social party was held after supper, and all who felt like it enjoyed themselves in the dance until about midnight; the best of order was observed.

Saturday, July 25. We traveled 11 miles on Joseph W. Young's cut-off, and camped for the night on the Platte. A thimble skein axle of Brother Rich's wagon broke, and a new one was substituted in the afternoon. A thunderstorm prevailed; good feed.

Sunday, July 26. Traveled half a mile beyond Crab Creek crossing, after traveling 10 miles; feed poor. Starting again we traveled 9 miles and camped for the night opposite Ancient Bluff Ruins; good feed, weather fair.

Monday, July 27. We traveled 10 miles, nooned on the Platte; good camping place. Starting again, we traveled 2 miles and camped for the night on the Platte. Brother J. [John] R. King broke the hind axle-tree of his horse wagon, which was repaired during the afternoon. Four Cheyenne Indians drove 4 head of oxen into the camp, which they had found about 20 miles back among the hills; these cattle were offered for sale, and the captain, feeling almost sure that they were Church property, bought them of those Indians for 4 double blankets, cut in two, making eight pieces. Geroge [George] Green gave two white colorer, Mary [Elizabeth Rollins] Lightner two blue, Ann Swift two white, and Elizabeth [Curtis] Short, jun., two white blankets. These blankets were to be returned for the value thereof by the lawful owner in Utah. The description of these oxen are: One light red horn mark of M. Co. and has a brand mark on the left quarter similar to this V. On Another was marked on the left horn with T. TA; the next letter was not distinct enough to tell. There was an E T, an M on the hind quarter, and a mark similar to this [hand-drawn brand] on the left side. The color of the animal was red and white. The third ox was a black and white animal, line back, white tail, and a brand on the left side similar to a heart. The fourth animal was a brindle marked JSM on the left horn.

Tuesday, July 28. We traveled 8 miles and nooned on the Platte; good feed. Starting again, we traveled 11 miles and camped for the night along the Platte, 2 miles below Chimney Rock; feed good, weather fair.

Wednesday, July 29. Traveled 12 miles and nooned on the Platte; in the afternoon traveled 6 miles and camped for the night on the Platte, 2 miles below Scott's Bluffs; good feed, weather warm during the day.

Thursday, July 30. We traveled 10 miles and nooned on a creek. Staring again, we traveled 6 miles and camped for the night on the Platte; good feed, weather fair.

Friday, July 31. Traveled 8 miles and nooned at Sloan Point; feed rather dry. Starting again, we traveled 6 miles and camped for the night on the Platte; weather fair. The captain bought a horse suitable for a trip of a mountaineer, stationed a little ways on the same side of the river, for $77.50. There being not enough money collected, he paid the deficiency out of his own pocket.

Saturday, August 1. Traveled 9 miles and nooned on the Platte. Starting again, we traveled <9 miles> and camped for the night on the Platte; feed dry, weather fair. A strayed ox of Capt. Murdock's train was redeemed by our captain of a mountaineer stationed opposite Bowie Branch by paying $10.00. Capt. Murdock left word with this mountaineer for Capt. Patterson to redeem the ox, if found.

Sunday, August 2. We traveled 4 miles and crossed the Platte River, opposite Fort Laramie, by fording. Nooned 5 miles beyond Laramie on the Platte. Starting again, we traveled 6 miles and camped on the Platte for the night; feed middling, weather cloudy.

Monday, August 3. Traveled 14 miles and camped for the night at the Cottonwood Spring. The cattle were driven 1 1/2 miles below the camp on the other side of the Platte River, where the grazing was good; weather fair.

Tuesday, August 4. We traveled 12 miles, and nooned on Horseshoe Creek; good feed, wood handy to get, weather fair. Starting again, we traveled 11 miles and camped on the Platte River for the night; middling feed, weather cloudy.

Wednesday, August 5. We traveled 8 miles, crossed the Platte by fording it, and camped for the night a short distance above the crossing; good feed and wood, weather fair.

Thursday, August 6. We traveled 13 miles, nooned on the Platte. The . little male child called Heber, about 13 months old, belonging to Sister Ann Swift, fell out of the front of her wagon, the mother being in it at the time; the hind wheel ran over both legs of the infant, but the child was anointed immediately after being hurt and the prospects were that it would soon recover without a blemish of any kind. Starting again as usual, we traveled 6 miles, crossed the Platte by fording and camped for the night half a mile beyond the crossing; little Heber is getting on fine.

Friday, August 7. One ox of Brother William Brown, and a cow belonging to Mr. Andrew J. Hall, died during the night; disease not known. After traveling 10 miles, we nooned on the Platte. Starting again, we traveled 11 miles and camped for the night on the Platte; feed dry, weather fair.

Saturday, August 8. Sister Ann Fotheringham and Brother Wm. Phipps lost an ox each by the same unknown disease, during the night. In the morning, before starting, Mr. D. M. Tayor [David M. Taylor], a fault-finding person, especially when his turn came to guard the cattle, when it fell to lot to be on guard the following night. Brother Hancock, upon hearing his grumbling, tried to satisfy him by showing him the guard, list which only resulted in Bro. Wm. W. Hancock receiving an insult from Mr. D. M. Tayor [Taylor], Mr. Tayor prepared a small bundle of clothes on purpose to return to the States, but after traveling a short distance, he came back and drove Sister Fotheringham's team again; he being her teamster. Bro. [Warren] Hancock, sergeant of the guard, took his name off the guard list with the intention of letting him severely alone, rather than being troubled with him any more. We traveled one mile beyond Deer Creek Station, and nooned. Starting again, we traveled 7 miles and camped for the night on the Muddy; good feed, wood and water.

Sunday, Aug. 9. Traveled 9 miles and nooned on the Platte. In the afternoon traveled 7 miles and camped for the night at Big Island, a good place for camping; weather fair. Bro. E. [Edwin] Bingham and Mr. Leroy Scovill lost an ox each by the disease before mentioned.

Monday, Aug. 10. Bro. N. [Nils] Nilsson's cow died during the past night. We traveled 7 miles, crossed the Platte on the new bridge, then traveled 3 miles further and nooned on the Platte Starting again, we traveled 6 miles and camped for the night on the Platte at a place called Red Butte; good feed, weather fair. Bro. Wm. Phipps lost an ox by death. A cow, belonging to Bro. [Richard Alexander] Beard, an ox belonging to Bro. [Frederick] Rich and another ox belonging to Amasa Scovill were found dead this morning. We made one drive to get out of the way of a Gentile train bound for Bannock City and camped at Fish Creek; feed middling, weather fair.

Wednesday, Aug. 12. We traveled 9 miles and nooned on Greasewood Creek, where the feed was good. Starting again, we traveled 4 miles and camped on Sweetwater; good feed, weather fair. A cow died this belonging to Albert Brown, died.

Thursday, Aug. 13. We traveled 10 miles and nooned at Devil's Gate. We started again and traveled 10 miles and camped for the night on Sweetwater; good feed across the river, weather fair. An ox belonging to Wm. Brown, died.

Friday, Aug. 14. We traveled 14 <13> miles and camped on the Sweetwater; laid by the remainder of the day to shoe oxen.

Saturday, Aug. 15. We traveled 10 miles and nooned on the Sweetwater. Starting again, we traveled 5 miles camped for the night on Sweetwater. The feed was good and weather fair. An ox belonging to A. [Alfred] Bennett died during the day.

Sunday, Aug. 16. We traveled 8 miles in the forenoon and 6 miles in the afternoon. Camped for the night at a spring; feed scant and weather windy.Monday, Aug. 17. We traveled 5 miles and watered our cattle in Saleratus Creek, after which we drove 3 miles more and stopped for noon without watering. Starting again, we traveled 5 miles and camped for the night in Antelope Hollow; feed middleing, water scarce, weather stormy. Bro. Wm. D. Johnson lost one of his oxen by death and A. G. [Andrew J.] Hall lost a bull that strayed off, being sick with the same plague or disease of which many cattle died this summer on the plains. This disease is something similar to the bloody murrain, except that the animals swell tremendously soon after death.

Tuesday, Aug. 18. We traveled 12 miles and camped on Sweetwater. The afternoon was spent in shoeing cattle, hunting, and repairing wagons. Bro Wm. Hancock killed an antelope. D. M. Tayor [David M. Taylor] and Joseph Zundell killed an antilope [antelope] yesterday. Bro. Wm. Cloward, A. [Alexander] Miller, George Cuningham and Jos. [Joseph] Wrigley left the company and went ahead anxious to get home. The two former had an ox team each the two latter, one in partnership, which they took with them.

Wednesday, Aug. 19. We traveled 10 miles and nnoed on Sweetwater. Starting again, we traveled 12 miles and camped again on the Sweetwater; good feed, weather pleasant. One of Bro. Copeland's oxen died.

Thursday, Aug. 20. The stray ox belonging to Capt. [John R.] Murdock's train died during the night. We traveled 7 miles and nooned on a branch of the Pacific Springs. Starting again, we traveled 10 miles and camped for the night without water. Bro. Warren Hancock wounded a brown bear in the forenoon, about 4 miles from where we nooned. He left the animal and came to camp. In the afternoon J. [John] R. King took, with his light wagon horse team, James Brooks, James Tedd [Tidd] and Harmon Bassett, accompanied Bro. Hancock to the place where the animal was left. They conquered the bear and brought him to camp after sundown.

Friday, Aug. 21. We traveled 10 miles and nooned on Little Sandy Creek. Sister Ann Swift, a woman weighing about 250 pounds, tried to get out of the front of the wagon without asking her driver to stop the team. She fell and the front wheel of the wagon ran over her head and back. The driver stopped the team at the moment and reproved her for not telling him to stop the team while she got out of the wagon. Her head and back were slightly injured, although not seriously.

Saturday, Aug. 22. Traveled 10 miles and nooned on the Big Sandy. Starting again, we traveled 8 miles and camped for the night on the same creek; feed middling, weather pleasant. Bro. G. [Jefferson] Copeland's cow died.

Sunday, Aug. 23. We traveled 9 miles and nooned on the Big Sandy. Starting again we traveled 7 miles and crossed Green River; camped for the night; feed middling, weather cold and stormy.

Monday, Aug. 24. We traveled 11 miles and nooned; dry camp. Starting again, we traveled 13 miles and camped for the night at Granger's Station on Hams Fork; feed middling, weather fair.

Tuesday, Aug. 25. Before starting in the morning, every male, native or foreign born, aged 18 years and over, took the oath of alleigence to the United States of America, as per general orders No. 25 (Current Series) before Lieutenant Cornall, commander of the U. S. troops stationed there. (Granger). This offercer acted in a very gentlemanly manner. Before we took the oath, he gave three cheers for the constitution of the United States of America. Traveled 13 miles and camped for the night on Black's Fork. Good feed, weather fair.

Wednesday, Aug. 26. We traveled 7 miles 7 miles and nooned on Black's Fork. In the afternoon we traveled 8 miles and camped for the night on the same stream; feed middling, weather fair.

Thursday, Aug. 27. We traveled 10 miles and nooned about 4 miles beyond Fort Bridger, where we had to show our certificates to prove that we had taken the oath of allegience at Granger Station. Starting again, we traveled 6 miles and camped for the night on the Little Muddy. Good feed, weather fair. Sister Wright's hip had fully recovered.

Friday, Aug. 28. We traveled 8 miles and camped for the night on Quaking Asp Creek; good feed, water and weather fair.

Saturday, Aug. 29. Traveled 8 miles, nooned at Sulphur Creek. Starting again, we traveled 6 miles, crossed Bear River and camped on a branch of Yellow Creek; good feed, weather cold.

Sunday, Aug. 30. Traveled 11 miles in one drive and camped at Cache Cave on Cache Creek, opposite the cave. Good feed, weather pleasant. At the usual evening meeting I read the donation list of

Wednesday, Sept. 2. We traveled 8 miles and nooned in Silver Creek Canyon. Starting again we traveled 6 miles and camped for the night in Parley's Park; good feed, weather rainy during the night.

Thursday, Sept. 3. We made one drive of 13 miles and camped in Parley's Canyon, where the feed was good. At this camp the captain made a settlement with the individuals who paid him the four blankets which were paid to the Indians for the oxen. (For particulars see July 27th) Except with Elizabeth [Curtis] Short who was willing to wait until she got into the city.

Friday, Sept. 4. We traveled 12 miles which brought us safely on to the Eighth Ward Square, G.S.L. City, where another settlement took place between Capt. Patterson and the parties who paid the blankets for the afore mentioned oxen. before Bishop Hunter and Elder Jesse C. Little.

MARTIN ZYDERLAAN, Clerk of the company

 

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